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Taxonomic Examination of ADHD and Conduct Problem Comorbidity in Elementary School Children Using Cluster Analyses

  • Sara King
  • Daniel A. WaschbuschEmail author
  • Bradley W. Frankland
  • Brendan F. Andrade
  • Catherine M. Thurston
  • Lisa McNutt
  • Branka Terrio
  • Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services
Article

Abstract

Cluster analysis was used to investigate the classification of comorbid Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) +Conduct Problems (CP). Teachers rated 1394 elementary school children on symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity, opposition, and conduct problems using the ADS-IV behavior-rating scale. Results suggested that a seven-cluster solution, including two distinct comorbid clusters, was the most appropriate method of classifying children according to behavioral symptoms. A one-way MANOVA showed that overall cluster profiles differed significantly from each other, whereas one-way ANOVAs indicated that clusters differed on age and symptom scores. Chi-square analyses indicated that clusters differed on gender. Post hoc analyses and effect sizes calculations revealed that the comorbid clusters differed from each other and from their single-disorder counterparts on some variables, but not on all. These results provide support for an additive conceptualisation of ADHD +CP.

KEY WORDS

ADHD conduct problems comorbidity taxonomy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sara King
    • 1
  • Daniel A. Waschbusch
    • 1
    Email author
  • Bradley W. Frankland
    • 1
  • Brendan F. Andrade
    • 1
  • Catherine M. Thurston
    • 2
  • Lisa McNutt
    • 3
  • Branka Terrio
    • 3
  • Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyDalhousie UniversityHalifax, Nova ScotiaCanada
  2. 2.Cumberland Mental Health ServicesCumberland
  3. 3.Chignecto—Central Regional School BoardNova ScotiaCanada
  4. 4.Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services is a collaborative venture to improve the quality of life for children and adolescents in Northern Nova Scotia through service and research. Participating agencies (listed alphabetically) include Chignecto—Central Regional School Board; Children’s Aid Societies of Pictou & Colchester Counties; Department of Community Services; Department of Justice; Department of Psychology at Dalhousie University; Department of Sport & Recreation; Early Intervention Services; Family and Children’s Services of Cumberland; Mental Health Services of Cumberland, Colchester/East Hants & Pictou Counties; Public Health Services, and Shubenacadie Band CouncilNova ScotiaCanada

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