Gender Differences in Smoking Cessation

  • Jose Reynoso
  • Agnes Susabda
  • Antonio Cepeda-Benito
Article

Abstract

In recent years researchers have paid particularly close attention to factors that might differentially influence smoking cessation outcomes in men and women. The present paper reviews empirical findings on gender differences in smoking cessation with focus on 1) nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), 2) depression and anxiety factors, 3) post-cessation weight gain and body-shape concerns, 4) post-cessation withdrawal, and 5) the importance of social support during smoking cessation. The findings call for research to examine the effects of 1) booster sessions following the discontinuation of NRT, 2) depression-prevention interventions for smokers with a history of depression, 3) strategies to prevent weight gain and reduce concerns about weight gain, 4) initiating treatment early in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, and 5) social support variables in promoting or hindering smoking cessation success.

Key words

review gender smoking treatment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jose Reynoso
    • 1
  • Agnes Susabda
    • 1
  • Antonio Cepeda-Benito
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyTexas A&M University, College Station
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyTexas A&M University, College Station

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