Preparation and characterization of fibrous chitosan-glued phosphate glass fiber scaffolds for bone regeneration

  • Kai Zheng
  • Zhaoying Wu
  • Jie Wei
  • Christian Rűssel
  • Wen Liang
  • Aldo R. Boccaccini
Biomaterials Synthesis and Characterization Original Research

DOI: 10.1007/s10856-015-5554-8

Cite this article as:
Zheng, K., Wu, Z., Wei, J. et al. J Mater Sci: Mater Med (2015) 26: 224. doi:10.1007/s10856-015-5554-8
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Biomaterials Synthesis and Characterization

Abstract

Phosphate glass fibers (PGF) have emerged as promising building blocks for constructing bone scaffolds. In this study, fibrous scaffolds (PGFS) were fabricated using a facile binding method at room temperature. PGFS exhibited an extracellular matrix-like morphology and were composed of PGF as matrix and chitosan as the natural binding glue. They showed an interconnected porous structure with a porosity of ~87 % and pore size of 100–500 µm. PGFS exhibited the typical compressive stress–strain behaviour of highly porous, low-density, open-cell scaffolds. Their yield stress and modulus were ~0.38 and ~2.84 MPa, respectively, with the strength being higher than the lower bound of the compressive strength of cancellous bone. PGFS were degradable and the weight loss was about 25 % after immersion in stimulated body fluid (SBF) for 28 days. In addition, the yield stress and the modulus decreased with increasing immersion time in SBF. Apatite formation could be detected on the surface of PGFS within 7 days of immersion in SBF. MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay indicated that PGFS were non-cytotoxic against bone marrow stromal cells (bMSCs) after culture for up to 72 h. These results suggest that PGFS could be promising scaffolds for bone regeneration applications.

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
China Scholarship Council
  • 201206740003

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kai Zheng
    • 1
  • Zhaoying Wu
    • 2
  • Jie Wei
    • 2
  • Christian Rűssel
    • 3
  • Wen Liang
    • 4
  • Aldo R. Boccaccini
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of BiomaterialsUniversity of Erlangen-NurembergErlangenGermany
  2. 2.Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of EducationEast China University of Science and TechnologyShanghaiChina
  3. 3.Otto Schott Institute of Materials ResearchJena UniversityJenaGermany
  4. 4.Institute of BiomaterialsEast China University of Science and TechnologyShanghaiChina

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