Synchrotron X-ray microtomography for assessment of bone tissue scaffolds

  • Sheng Yue
  • Peter D. Lee
  • Gowsihan Poologasundarampillai
  • Zhengzhong Yao
  • Peter Rockett
  • Andrea H. Devlin
  • Christopher A. Mitchell
  • Moritz A. Konerding
  • Julian R. Jones
Article

Abstract

X-ray microtomography (μCT) is a popular tool for imaging scaffolds designed for tissue engineering applications. The ability of synchrotron μCT to monitor tissue response and changes in a bioactive glass scaffold ex vivo were assessed. It was possible to observe the morphology of the bone; soft tissue ingrowth and the calcium distribution within the scaffold. A second aim was to use two newly developed compression rigs, one designed for use inside a laboratory based μCT machine for continual monitoring of the pore structure and crack formation and another designed for use in the synchrotron facility. Both rigs allowed imaging of the failure mechanism while obtaining stress–strain data. Failure mechanisms of the bioactive glass scaffolds were found not to follow classical predictions for the failure of brittle foams. Compression strengths were found to be 4.5–6 MPa while maintaining an interconnected pore network suitable for tissue engineering applications.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Julian Jones is a Royal Academy of Engineering/Engineering and Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC) Research Fellow. The authors also acknowledge financial support from the Philip Leverhulme Prize and EPSRC (GR/T26344). The European Synchrotron Radiation Facility especially the team of beam line ID19, especially Elodie Boller is greatly acknowledged for the provision of synchrotron radiation facilities.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sheng Yue
    • 1
  • Peter D. Lee
    • 1
  • Gowsihan Poologasundarampillai
    • 1
  • Zhengzhong Yao
    • 1
  • Peter Rockett
    • 1
  • Andrea H. Devlin
    • 2
  • Christopher A. Mitchell
    • 2
  • Moritz A. Konerding
    • 3
  • Julian R. Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MaterialsImperial College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.University of UlsterColeraineUK
  3. 3.Department of AnatomyJohannes Gutenberg UniversityMainzGermany

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