Advertisement

Superior potassium storage in natural O/N–doped hard carbon derived from maple leaves

  • Minqing Liu
  • Dong Jing
  • Yueli ShiEmail author
  • Quanchao ZhuangEmail author
Article
  • 42 Downloads

Abstract

Biomaterial has a significant place in energy storage for its utilization of renewable and cost-effective advantages. Herein, we study a hard carbon material (MHC) derived from the maple leaves through a simple carbonization and HNO3-treated activation. XPS and FT-IR analysis shows that the carbon materials are naturally functionalized by O/N-containing groups. Such a dual O/N-containing MHC, when used as a potassium-ion batteries (PIBs) electrode, shows an excellent capacity of 273.2 mAh g−1 (50 mA g−1) at the 100th cycle and good cycling performance of 141.9 mAh g−1 (1 A g−1) at the 1000th cycle. Thereby, it provides an environmentally friendly method of making maple leaf waste profitable in term of anode materials for PIBs.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the China University of Mining and Technology (Grant No. 2017XKQY063).

Supplementary material

10854_2019_1219_MOESM1_ESM.docx (549 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 548 kb)

References

  1. 1.
    D. Jia et al., Carbon nanosheet frameworks derived from peat moss as high performance sodium ion battery anodes. ACS Nano 7(12), 11004 (2013)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    K. Saravanan, V. Mullaivananathan, N. Kalaiselvi, Dual hetero atom containing bio-carbon: multifunctional electrode material for high performance sodium-ion batteries and oxygen reduction reaction. Electrochim. Acta 176, 670–678 (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    H. Yang et al., Preparation of bacterial cellulose based nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers and their applications in oxygen reduction reaction and sodium-ion battery. New J. Chem. (2018).  https://doi.org/10.1039/C8NJ00708J Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    H. Zhu et al., Low temperature carbonization of cellulose nanocrystals for high performance carbon anode of sodium-ion batteries. Nano Energy 33, 37–44 (2017)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    W. Luo et al., Potassium ion batteries with graphitic materials. Nano Lett. 15(11), 7671–7677 (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Y. Xu et al., Highly nitrogen doped carbon nanofibers with superior rate capability and cyclability for potassium ion batteries. Nat. Commun. 9(1), 1720 (2018)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    B. Ji et al., A novel potassium-ion-based dual-ion battery. Adv. Mater. 29(19), 1700519 (2017)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    S. Jiao et al., A room temperature solid state dual-ion battery based on gel electrolyte. J. Mater. Chem. A (2018).  https://doi.org/10.1039/C8TA00221E Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    S. Komaba et al., Potassium intercalation into graphite to realize high-voltage/high-power potassium-ion batteries and potassium-ion capacitors. Electrochem. Commun. 60, 172–175 (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Z. Jian et al., Hard carbon microspheres: potassium-ion anode versus sodium-ion anode. Adv. Energy Mater. 6(3), 1501874 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    L. Xue et al., A low-cost high-energy potassium cathode. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 139(6), 2164–2167 (2017)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    W. Zhang et al., Phosphorus-based alloy materials for advanced potassium-ion battery anode. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 139(9), 3316–3319 (2017)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    A. Eftekhari, Z. Jian, X. Ji, Potassium secondary batteries. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 9(5), 4404–4419 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    C. Chen et al., Nitrogen-rich hard carbon as a highly durable anode for high-power potassium-ion batteries. Energy Storage Mater. 8, 161–168 (2017)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    J. Yang et al., Enhanced capacity and rate capability of nitrogen/oxygen dual-doped hard carbon in capacitive potassium-ion storage. Adv. Mater. 30(4), 1700104 (2018)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    X. Zhao et al., High rate and long cycle life porous carbon nanofiber paper anodes for potassium-ion batteries. J. Mater. Chem. A (2017).  https://doi.org/10.1039/C7TA04264G Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    L. Wang et al., Antimony/reduced graphene oxide composites as advanced anodes for potassium ion batteries. J. Appl. Electrochem. 48(10), 1115–1120 (2018)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    B. Cao et al., Graphitic carbon nanocage as a stable and high power anode for potassium-ion batteries. Adv. Energy Mater. 8(25), 1801149 (2018)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    C. Mei et al., Sulfur/oxygen codoped porous hard carbon microspheres for high-performance potassium-ion batteries. Adv. Energy Mater. 8(9), 1800171 (2018)Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Y. Li et al., Amorphous monodispersed hard carbon micro-spherules derived from biomass as a high performance negative electrode material for sodium-ion batteries. J. Mater. Chem. A 3(1), 71–77 (2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Y.Y. Wang et al., Hierarchically porous N-doped carbon nanosheets derived from grapefruit peels for high-performance supercapacitors. Chemistryselect 1(7), 1441–1447 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Y. Xie et al., Carbon nanotube based polymer nanocomposites: biomimic preparation and organic dye adsorption applications. RSC Adv. 5(100), 82503–82512 (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    N. Moreno et al., Lithium–sulfur batteries with activated carbons derived from olive stones. Carbon 70(4), 241–248 (2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    H. Zhao et al., Egg yolk-derived phosphorus and nitrogen dual doped nano carbon capsules for high-performance lithium ion batteries. Mater. Lett. 167, 93–97 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    X. Zhu et al., A green route to synthesize low-cost and high-performance hard carbon as promising sodium-ion battery anodes from sorghum stalk waste. Green Energy Environ. 2(3), 310–315 (2017)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    X. Sun et al., A new carbonaceous material derived from biomass source peels as an improved anode for lithium ion batteries. J. Anal. Appl. Pyrol. 100(3), 181–185 (2013)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    R.R. Gaddam et al., Biomass derived carbon nanoparticle as anodes for high performance sodium and lithium ion batteries. Nano Energy 26, 346–352 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    H. Jianhua et al., Hierarchical porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheets derived from silk for ultrahigh-capacity battery anodes and supercapacitors. ACS Nano 9(3), 2556 (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    W. Luo et al., Carbon nanofibers derived from cellulose nanofibers as a long-life anode material for rechargeable sodium-ion batteries. J. Mater. Chem. A 1(36), 10662–10666 (2013)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    T. Sariyildiz, J.M. Anderson, Variation in the chemical composition of green leaves and leaf litters from three deciduous tree species growing on different soil types. For. Ecol. Manag. 210(1–3), 309–319 (2005)Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Y. Ding et al., Rapid and up-scalable fabrication of free-standing metal oxide nanosheets for high-performance lithium storage. Small 11(17), 2011–2018 (2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    Y. Zhao et al., Oxygen-rich hierarchical porous carbon derived from artemia cyst shells with superior electrochemical performance. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces. 7(2), 1132–1139 (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. 33.
    H. Li et al., Carbonized leaf membrane with anisotropic surfaces for sodium ion battery. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces. 8(3), 2204 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. 34.
    Y. Liu et al., Mechanism of lithium insertion in hard carbons prepared by pyrolysis of epoxy resins. Carbon 34(2), 193–200 (1996)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. 35.
    S.W. Han et al., Effect of pyrolysis temperature on carbon obtained from green tea biomass for superior lithium ion battery anodes. Chem. Eng. J. 254(7), 597–604 (2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. 36.
    A. Sadezky et al., Raman microspectroscopy of soot and related carbonaceous materials: spectral analysis and structural information. Carbon 43(8), 1731–1742 (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. 37.
    V. Selvamani et al., Garlic peel derived high capacity hierarchical N-doped porous carbon anode for sodium/lithium ion cell. Electrochim. Acta 190, 337–345 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. 38.
    A.C. Dillon, M. Yudasaka, M.S. Dresselhaus, Employing Raman spectroscopy to qualitatively evaluate the purity of carbon single-wall nanotube materials. J. Nanosci. Nanotechnol. 4(7), 691–703 (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. 39.
    X. Zhang et al., Thermal reduction of graphene oxide mixed with hard carbon and their high performance as lithium ion battery anode. Carbon 100, 600–607 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. 40.
    J. Ding et al., Carbon nanosheet frameworks derived from peat moss as high performance sodium ion battery anodes. ACS Nano 7(12), 11004 (2013)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. 41.
    M. Li, J. Xue, Integrated synthesis of nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon from melamine resins with superior performance in supercapacitors. J. Phys. Chem. C 118(5), 2507–2517 (2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. 42.
    A.M. Puziy et al., Characterization of synthetic carbons activated with phosphoric acid. Appl. Surf. Sci. 200(1), 196–202 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. 43.
    Y. Zhou et al., Nitrogen and sulfur dual-doped graphene sheets as anode materials with superior cycling stability for lithium-ion batteries. Electrochim. Acta 184, 24–31 (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. 44.
    J.D. Wigginscamacho, K.J. Stevenson, Effect of nitrogen concentration on capacitance, density of states, electronic conductivity, and morphology of N-doped carbon nanotube electrodes. J. Phys. Chem. C 113(44), 19082–19090 (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. 45.
    H. Rui et al., Superior potassium storage in chitin-derived natural nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers. Carbon 128, 224–230 (2018)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. 46.
    X. Qi et al., Novel fabrication of N-doped hierarchically porous carbon with exceptional potassium storage properties. Carbon 131, 79–85 (2018)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. 47.
    C. Chen et al., Nitrogen-rich hard carbon as a highly durable anode for high-power potassium-ion batteries. Energy Storage Mater. 8, 161–168 (2017)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. 48.
    B. Dhrubajyoti et al., Nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticles by flame synthesis as anode material for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Langmuir 30(1), 318–324 (2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. 49.
    J.D. Wiggins-Camacho, K.J. Stevenson, Effect of nitrogen concentration on capacitance, density of states, electronic conductivity, and morphology of N-doped carbon nanotube electrodes. J. Phys. Chem. C 113(44), 19082–19090 (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Lithium-ion Batteries Laboratory, School of Materials Science and EngineeringChina University of Mining and TechnologyXuzhouChina

Personalised recommendations