Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 51, Issue 1, pp 271–310

A review of hydrogel-based composites for biomedical applications: enhancement of hydrogel properties by addition of rigid inorganic fillers

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DOI: 10.1007/s10853-015-9382-5

Cite this article as:
Utech, S. & Boccaccini, A.R. J Mater Sci (2016) 51: 271. doi:10.1007/s10853-015-9382-5
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Abstract

There is a growing demand for three-dimensional scaffolds for expanding applications in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and cell culture techniques. The material requirements for such three-dimensional structures are as diverse as the applications themselves. A wide range of materials have been investigated in the recent decades in order to tackle these requirements and to stimulate the anticipated biological response. Among the most promising class of materials are inorganic/organic hydrogel composites for regenerative medicine. The generation of synergetic effects by hydrogel composite systems enables the design of materials with superior properties including biological performance, stiffness, and degradation behavior in vitro and in vivo. Here, we review the most important organic and inorganic materials used to fabricate hydrogel composites. We highlight the advantages of combining different materials with respect to their use for biofabrication and cell encapsulation as well as their application as injectable materials for tissue enhancement and regeneration.

Graphical abstract

Abbreviations

ALP

Alkaline phosphatase

ABM

Acellular bone matrix

Ag-NPs

Silver nanoparticles

BCP

Biphasic calcium phosphate

BG

Bioactive glass

BMP-2

Morphogenetic protein-2

BMPs

Recombinant human bone morphogenic proteins

BMSC

Bone marrow stromal cells

CA

Collagen–alginate

CaP

Calcium phosphate (apatite)

CaP

Apatitic nanoparticles

CNSC

Carbon nanotube chain

CNT

Carbon nanotube

CONP

Cerium oxide nanoparticle

CPC

Calcium phosphate cement

DPSC

Dental pulp stem cell

ECM

Extracellular matrix

EHS

Engelbreth–Holm–Swarm mouse sarcoma

ELP

Elastin-like polypeptide

EPO

Erythropoietin

FBS

Fetal bovine serum

Gel

Gelatin

GelMA

Gelatin methacrylate

GG

Gellan gum

GO

Graphene oxide

HA

Hyaluronic acid

HA-CPN

Hyaluronic acid-g-chitosan-g-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)

HAp

Hydroxyapatite

hBMSC

Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

HCA

Carbonated hydroxyapatite

hFOBs

Human fetal osteoblastic cells

HPMC

Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose

IBS

Injectable bone substitute

IEP

Isoelectric point

LCST

Lower critical solution temperature

MBG

Mesoporous bioactive glass

nBG

Nano-bioglass

nHAp

Nano-hydroxyapatite

OC

Osteocalcin

OPF

Oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate

PAAc or PAA

Poly(acrylic acid)

PCL

Poly(ε-caprolactone)

PEG

Poly(ethylene glycol)

PEGDA

PEG diacrylate

PEGDMA

PEG dimethacrylate

PELGA

Poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol)

pHEMA

Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)

PLEOF

Poly(lactide ethylene oxide fumarate)

PLGA

Poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid)

pNIPAAm

Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)

polyp

Polyphosphate

PPO

Poly(propylene oxide)

Si-HPMC

Silated hydroxypropylmethylcellulose

SPIONS

Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

TCP

Tricalcium phosphate

TE

Tissue engineering

TTCP

Tetracalcium phosphate

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of BiomaterialsUniversity of Erlangen-NurembergErlangenGermany

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