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Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 44, Issue 1, pp 221–226 | Cite as

A novel spherical carbon

  • Kiyoharu Nakagawa
  • Hirokazu Oda
  • Akira Yamashita
  • Masahiro Okamoto
  • Yoichi Sato
  • Hidenori Gamo
  • Mikka Nishitani-Gamo
  • Kazuyuki Ogawa
  • Toshihiro AndoEmail author
Article

Abstract

We developed a novel spherical carbon material. The spherical carbon is composed of a high density of carbon nanotubes or nanofilaments, and includes an oxidized diamond particle as a core. Syntheses of this carbon in high volume with high selectivity may be possible. It is expected that this carbon will be useful as a catalyst material for fuel cells, electric double-layer capacitors, etc.

Keywords

Carbon Nanotubes Scan Transmission Electron Microscopy Diamond Particle Spherical Carbon Show Scanning Electron Microscopy Image 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kiyoharu Nakagawa
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Hirokazu Oda
    • 4
    • 5
  • Akira Yamashita
    • 4
    • 5
  • Masahiro Okamoto
    • 4
    • 5
  • Yoichi Sato
    • 6
  • Hidenori Gamo
    • 7
  • Mikka Nishitani-Gamo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kazuyuki Ogawa
    • 3
  • Toshihiro Ando
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of EngineeringToyo UniversityKawagoeJapan
  2. 2.Sensor Photonics Research CenterToyo UniversityKawagoeJapan
  3. 3.National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS)TsukubaJapan
  4. 4.Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of EngineeringKansai UniversitySuitaJapan
  5. 5.High Technology Research CenterKansai UniversitySuitaJapan
  6. 6.NBO Development CenterSekisui Chemical Co., Ltd.TsukubaJapan
  7. 7.Technical Research InstituteToppan Printing Co. Ltd.SugitoJapan

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