Advertisement

Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 43, Issue 11, pp 3812–3816 | Cite as

Investigation of micro-structural transition through disproportionation and recombination during hydrogenation and dehydrogenation in Mg/Cu super-laminates

  • Koji TanakaEmail author
  • Nobuhiko Takeichi
  • Hideaki Tanaka
  • Nobuhiro Kuriyama
  • Tamotsu T. Ueda
  • Makoto Tsukahara
  • Hiroshi Miyamura
  • Shiomi Kikuchi
Intergranular and Interphase Boundaries in Materials

Abstract

Micro/nano-structures and hydrogen storage properties of Mg/Cu super-laminates were investigated. Mg/Cu super-laminates showed reversible hydrogenation and dehydrogenation at 473 K. In order to clarify the process of hydrogenation and dehydrogenation at 473 K, we performed TEM observations of micro/nano-structures of the Mg/Cu super-laminates and Mg2Cu powder prepared by conventional casting method. TEM observations revealed that the as-rolled Mg/Cu super-laminates had laminated structures in size of sub-micrometer thickness composed of Mg and Cu layers with dense lattice defects. The super-laminates after initial activation kept laminated structures and had uniformly distributed pores with a sub-micrometer diameter. On the other hand, the cast Mg2Cu powder after initial activation had pores only beneath the surface oxide layers. It is considered that these micro/nano-structures of Mg/Cu super-laminates lead to lower dehydrogenation temperature and better kinetics, which would contribute to achieve high-performance hydrogen storage materials.

Keywords

Dehydrogenation Initial Activation MgH2 Laminate Structure Hydrogen Storage Medium 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank Dr. T. Kiyobayashi, Dr. S. Ikeda, and Mr. K. Nakamura for TG measurements and discussions. The studies were administrated through the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) as a part of the Development for Safety Use and Infrastructure of Hydrogen Program, with funding of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan (METI).

References

  1. 1.
    Stampfer Jr JF, Holley Jr CE, Suttle JF (1960) J Am Chem Soc 82:3504CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Orimo S, Fujii H, Ikeda K (1998) Acta Mater 45:331CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Liang G, Huot J, Boily S, Schulz R (2000) J Alloys and Comp 305:239CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Reilly JJ, Wiswall RH (1967) Inorg Chem 6:2220CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Reilly JJ, Wiswall RH (1968) Inorg Chem 7:2254CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Ueda TT, Tsukahara M, Kamiya Y, Kikuchi S (2004) Japan Institute of Metals 2004 Spring Meeting Abstracts, p 170 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Ueda TT, Tsukahara M, Kamiya Y, Kikuchi S (2005) J Alloys and Comp 386:253CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Takeichi N, Tanaka K, Tanaka H, Ueda TT, Kamiya Y, Tsukahara M, Miyamura H, Kikuchi S (2006) Proceedings of 16th World Hydrogen Energy Conference, ref 465.1Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Kissinger HE (1957) Anal Chem 29:1702CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Koji Tanaka
    • 1
    Email author
  • Nobuhiko Takeichi
    • 1
  • Hideaki Tanaka
    • 1
  • Nobuhiro Kuriyama
    • 1
  • Tamotsu T. Ueda
    • 2
  • Makoto Tsukahara
    • 2
  • Hiroshi Miyamura
    • 3
  • Shiomi Kikuchi
    • 3
  1. 1.National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)IkedaJapan
  2. 2.IMRA Material R&D Co. Ltd.KariyaJapan
  3. 3.The University of Shiga PrefectureHikoneJapan

Personalised recommendations