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Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 42, Issue 8, pp 2792–2795 | Cite as

Synthesis and optical properties of naturally occurring fluorescent mineral, ferroan sphalerite, inspired (Fe,Zn)S nanoparticles

  • Timothy J. BoyleEmail author
  • Harry D. PrattIII
  • Bernadette A. Hernandez-Sanchez
  • Timothy N. Lambert
  • Thomas J. Headley
Article

Abstract

Inspired by the naturally occurring fluorescent mineral, ferroan sphalerite, [(Fe,Zn)S] nanoparticles were synthesized by a three component reaction of [Fe(Mes)2]2 (Mes = mesityl or C6H2Me3-2,4,6), [Zn(Et)(ONep)(py)]2, and elemental S via both solution and solvothermal routes. The resultant nanoparticles are ≤3 nm and absorb at λmax = 281 nm emitting a bright blue color (λem ∼400 nm).

Keywords

High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Zinc Sulfide Mesityl Metal Alkoxide Lead Chalcogenide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgement

Drs J. Oliver and B. Wilson (University of New Mexico) for helpful discussions. Support for this work was by: the National Institutes of Health through the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research, Grant 1 R21 EB005365-01 where information on this RFA (Innovation in Molecular Imaging Probes) can be found at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-04-021.html; the Office of Basic Energy Sciences at the Department of Energy, and the United State Department of Energy. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Timothy J. Boyle
    • 1
    Email author
  • Harry D. PrattIII
    • 1
  • Bernadette A. Hernandez-Sanchez
    • 1
  • Timothy N. Lambert
    • 1
  • Thomas J. Headley
    • 1
  1. 1.Sandia National LaboratoriesAdvanced Materials LaboratoryAlbuquerqueUSA

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