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Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 42, Issue 12, pp 4177–4182 | Cite as

A multi-scaled model for the fracture toughness of an aluminum alloy

  • Min SongEmail author
  • Kang Hua Chen
  • Xiong Wei Qi
  • Lan Ping Huang
Article

Abstract

A multi-scaled model for the fracture toughness of an aluminum alloy has been developed that agrees well with the experimental data. It has been shown that fracture toughness decreases as the volume fraction of the first-class (related to microconstituents/inclusions) and second-class (related to second phase precipitates) microcracks increase, with the first-class microcracks have greater and more obvious effects. Thus, decreasing the volume fraction of the microconstituents (normally Fe and Si impurities) can decrease the volume fraction of the first-class microcracks and help improve the fracture toughness. At the same time, decreasing the volume fraction of the precipitates along the grain boundaries can also improve the fracture toughness by decreasing the volume fraction of the second-class microcracks.

Keywords

Aluminum Alloy Fracture Toughness Plastic Strain Rolled Plate Large Axis 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This work was supported by the Chinese National Key Fundamental Research Project (2005CB623704) on Al.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Min Song
    • 1
    Email author
  • Kang Hua Chen
    • 1
  • Xiong Wei Qi
    • 1
  • Lan Ping Huang
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Powder MetallurgyCentral South UniversityChangshaPR China

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