Journal of Intelligent Manufacturing

, Volume 18, Issue 5, pp 529–542

A comprehensive modeling framework for collaborative networked organizations

Article

Abstract

Collaborative networked organizations (CNOs) are complex entities whose proper understanding, design, implementation, and management require the integration of different modeling perspectives. A large number of modeling tools and theories that have been developed in other disciplines have a potential applicability in this domain. Therefore, an identification of the most promising approaches is made and mapped into four dimensions of an endogenous perspective of collaborative networked organizations: structural, componential, functional, and behavioral. But a comprehensive modeling of such complex dynamic systems requires also an exogenous perspective, the life cycle dimension, and a stratification of models according to the modeling purpose. Thus a comprehensive modeling framework is therefore proposed as a first step towards the elaboration of a reference model for collaborative networks.

Keywords

Collaborative networks Virtual organizations Virtual enterprises Modeling framework 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.New University of LisbonMonte CaparicaPortugal
  2. 2.University of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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