Journal of Educational Change

, Volume 7, Issue 4, pp 221–258 | Cite as

Professional Learning Communities: A Review of the Literature

  • Louise Stoll
  • Ray Bolam
  • Agnes McMahon
  • Mike Wallace
  • Sally Thomas
Article

Abstract

International evidence suggests that educational reform’s progress depends on teachers’ individual and collective capacity and its link with school-wide capacity for promoting pupils’ learning. Building capacity is therefore critical. Capacity is a complex blend of motivation, skill, positive learning, organisational conditions and culture, and infrastructure of support. Put together, it gives individuals, groups, whole school communities and school systems the power to get involved in and sustain learning over time. Developing professional learning communities appears to hold considerable promise for capacity building for sustainable improvement. As such, it has become a ‘hot topic’ in many countries.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louise Stoll
    • 1
  • Ray Bolam
    • 1
  • Agnes McMahon
    • 1
  • Mike Wallace
    • 1
  • Sally Thomas
    • 1
  1. 1.London Centre for Leadership in Learning Institute of EducationUniversity of LondonLondonUnited Kingdom

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