Journal of Child and Family Studies

, Volume 21, Issue 4, pp 578–588 | Cite as

Recruiting and Retaining High-Risk Adolescents into Family-Based HIV Prevention Intervention Research

  • Chisina T. Kapungu
  • Carla M. Nappi
  • Charu Thakral
  • Steven A. Miller
  • Catharine Devlin
  • Cami McBride
  • Emily Hasselquist
  • Gloria Coleman
  • Derek Drozd
  • Chinmayee Barve
  • Geri Donenberg
  • Ralph DiClemente
  • Larry Brown
  • Project STYLE Study Group
Original Paper

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of evidence-based recruitment and retention strategies for a longitudinal, family-based HIV prevention intervention study targeting adolescents in psychiatric care by (1) determining consent rate (recruitment), rate of participation at the first intervention session (retention), and follow-up attendance rate (retention); and (2) examining socio-demographic factors, family-level processes, sexual risk-related indices, and intervention factors (i.e., treatment arm) associated with study retention. Only one-third of the families contacted ultimately enrolled in the study. 81% of those enrolled participated in the workshop and 72% attended the booster sessions with no significant differences between families on any variable based on attendance. Retention over 1 year was 85% and did not differ by treatment arm. Strategies employed were successful at retaining families once they were enrolled. Findings highlight barriers to enrollment for adolescents in psychiatric care and suggest that it may be critical to integrate HIV prevention programs within community-based mental health services in order to counteract recruitment challenges.

Keywords

Recruitment Adolescents HIV prevention Family-based research 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chisina T. Kapungu
    • 1
  • Carla M. Nappi
    • 2
  • Charu Thakral
    • 3
  • Steven A. Miller
    • 4
  • Catharine Devlin
    • 5
  • Cami McBride
    • 6
  • Emily Hasselquist
    • 5
  • Gloria Coleman
    • 5
  • Derek Drozd
    • 7
  • Chinmayee Barve
    • 5
  • Geri Donenberg
    • 5
  • Ralph DiClemente
    • 8
  • Larry Brown
    • 9
  • Project STYLE Study Group
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA
  2. 2.University of CaliforniaSan DiegoUSA
  3. 3.Office of DiversityUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA
  4. 4.Argosy UniversityChicagoUSA
  5. 5.Department of PsychiatryInstitute for Juvenile Research, University of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA
  6. 6.Department of PsychologyRoosevelt UniversityChicagoUSA
  7. 7.Illinois State UniversityNormalUSA
  8. 8.School of Public HealthEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  9. 9.Department of PsychiatryRhode Island Hospital and the Alpert School of Medicine of Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA

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