Journal of Child and Family Studies

, Volume 20, Issue 2, pp 182–195 | Cite as

Mothers and Fathers in Family Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxious Youth

Original Paper

Abstract

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders in youth has been evaluated in randomized clinical trials and found to be an efficacious treatment. Studies have investigated the effects of increased parental/family involvement in treatment. In the majority of these studies, however, parental involvement is synonymous with maternal involvement leaving the role of fathers unknown. Studies including parents in treatment have yet to examine the independent contribution of mothers and fathers to child outcome. We examined the relationship between both mother (n = 45) and father (n = 45) attendance and engagement in therapy sessions, maternal and paternal psychopathology, and child (n = 45) treatment outcome when parents were included in a Family CBT program for anxiety-disordered youth. Some indications were found for the notion that greater rates of mother and father attendance in session, as well as higher ratings of mother and father engagement in session, are associated with improved child outcome. Parental psychopathology was not associated with attendance, engagement, or child outcome. Recommendations for future research are offered.

Keywords

Child anxiety Cognitive-behavior therapy Father involvement Mother involvement Treatment outcome 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Child and Adolescent Anxiety Disorders ClinicTemple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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