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Journal of Child and Family Studies

, Volume 14, Issue 4, pp 521–534 | Cite as

Adherence to Wraparound Principles and Association with Outcomes

  • Eric J. BrunsEmail author
  • Jesse C. Suter
  • Michelle M. Force
  • John D. Burchard
Article

Abstract

Maintaining fidelity to the principles of the Wraparound process in serving children with emotional and behavioral disorders is a high priority. However, the assumption that greater adherence to the model will yield superior outcomes has not been tested. The current study investigated associations between adherence to Wraparound principles, as assessed by the Wraparound Fidelity Index, second version (WFI), and child and family outcomes in one federally funded system-of-care site. Results demonstrated that higher fidelity was associated with better behavioral, functioning, restrictiveness of living, and satisfaction outcomes. No associations were found for several additional outcomes making interpretation difficult. Our study provides initial support for the hypothesis that maintaining fidelity to the philosophical principles of Wraparound is important to achieving outcomes. The study also provides support for the construct validity of the WFI as a service process measure.

Key Words

wraparound process treatment fidelity outcomes evaluation children's mental health 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric J. Bruns
    • 1
    • 4
    Email author
  • Jesse C. Suter
    • 2
  • Michelle M. Force
    • 2
  • John D. Burchard
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Washington School of MedicineSeattle
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of VermontBurlington
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of VermontBurlington
  4. 4.School of Medicine, Division of Public Behavioral Health and Justice PolicyUniversity of Washington

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