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Journal of Computational Electronics

, Volume 6, Issue 1–3, pp 15–18 | Cite as

3D Monte-Carlo device simulations using an effective quantum potential including electron-electron interactions

  • Clemens Heitzinger
  • Christian Ringhofer
  • Shaikh Ahmed
  • Dragica Vasileska
Article

Abstract

Effective quantum potentials describe the physics of quantum-mechanical electron transport in semiconductors more than the classical Coulomb potential. An effective quantum potential was derived previously for the interaction of an electron with a barrier for use in particle-based Monte Carlo semiconductor device simulators. The method is based on a perturbation theory around thermodynamic equilibrium and leads to an effective potential scheme in which the size of the electron depends upon its energy and which is parameter-free. Here we extend the method to electron-electron interactions and show how the effective quantum potential can be evaluated efficiently in the context of many-body problems. The effective quantum potential was used in a three-dimensional Monte-Carlo device simulator for calculating the electron-electron and electron-barrier interactions. Simulation results for an SOI transistor are presented and illustrate how the effective quantum potential changes the characteristics compared to the classical potential.

Keywords

Monte-Carlo simulation Effective quantum potential Electron-electron interactions 

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Copyright information

© 2006 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Clemens Heitzinger
    • 1
  • Christian Ringhofer
    • 1
  • Shaikh Ahmed
    • 2
  • Dragica Vasileska
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of MathematicsArizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  2. 2.Department of Electrical EngineeringArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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