Elevated body mass index (BMI) does not adversely affect in vitro fertilization outcome in young women

  • Kurt Martinuzzi
  • Sarah Ryan
  • Martha Luna
  • Alan B. Copperman
Assisted Reproduction

DOI: 10.1007/s10815-008-9213-6

Cite this article as:
Martinuzzi, K., Ryan, S., Luna, M. et al. J Assist Reprod Genet (2008) 25: 169. doi:10.1007/s10815-008-9213-6

Abstract

Objective

To determine if elevated body mass index in young women with normal ovarian reserve was associated with poorer ovarian response, difficulty at embryo transfer, and lower clinical pregnancy rates.

Materials and methods

Retrospective study of 417 first, fresh in vitro fertilization cycles performed between October 2004 and December 2006. All women were under the age of 35 and had normal cycle day 3 follicle stimulating hormone and estradiol levels. Subjects were divided into groups by BMI: <18.5, 18.5–24.9, 25–29.9, ≥30.

Results

Cancellation rates, peak estradiol levels, and mean number of oocytes retrieved were similar in all groups. There was a trend toward increasing difficulty in visualizing the air bubble at time of embryo transfer and lower implantation rates at higher body mass indices. Clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates were similar among groups.

Conclusion

Obesity in young women does not adversely affect clinical pregnancy rates in patients treated with in vitro fertilization.

Keywords

BMI Clinical pregnancy Embryo transfer IVF 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kurt Martinuzzi
    • 1
  • Sarah Ryan
    • 1
  • Martha Luna
    • 2
  • Alan B. Copperman
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Mt. Sinai Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive ScienceNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Reproductive Medicine Associates of New YorkNew YorkUSA

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