Advertisement

New Research on the “Kings of Metal”: Systems of Social Distinction in the Copper Age of Southeastern Europe

  • Florian KlimschaEmail author
Article
  • 28 Downloads

Abstract

This paper discusses the degree of social complexity in southeastern Europe in the fifth millennium BC and presents previously unreported evidence from the tell societies of the Lower Danube. Based on the analysis of stone, flint, and copper axes of various types from Pietrele in southern Romania, I argue that social distinction, as deduced from the Varna cemetery, also can be identified in contemporary neighboring regions with poorer burial rituals. In these societies, some members distinguished themselves by their access and accumulation of prestigious items, with a special emphasis on axes, adzes, and shaft-hole axes. This socioeconomic constellation was ideal for the adoption of metallurgy, which was considerably developed for the production of prestigious axe heads. These, in turn, stimulated innovation in other crafts and materials. Distribution patterns, source-critical consideration, and new excavation results indicate that the social order visible in the cemetery of Varna was not limited to the western Black Sea coast but was shared by neighboring communities, where the social reality was masked in seemingly egalitarian funeral rites. Through this discussion, I also bring in recent evidence for early metallurgy in southwestern Asia.

Keywords

Copper Age Southeastern Europe Axes and adzes Early metallurgy Social complexity Social inequality 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This text is in large parts the result of my participation in the Pietrele Project of the Eurasia Department of the German Archaeological Institute. I thank Svend Hansen for his help and unparalleled commitment to my work. I also thank Gary Feinman and Linda Nicholas for their welcoming assistance and kind invitation to write this paper as well as the six anonymous and one open peer reviewer, whose insights, comments, and criticism have helped to sharpen the focus of the paper. Any errors remain my own.

References Cited

  1. Aardsma, G. E. (2001). New radiocarbon dates for the reed mat from the Cave of the Treasure, Israel. Radiocarbon 43: 1247–1254.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Angelova, I. (1986). Praistorijki nekropol pri gr. Targovište, în Arheoloijski Institut i muzej na Ban. Interdiscijplinarni Izsledvanija 15A: 49–66.Google Scholar
  3. Anthony, D.W. (1995). Nazi and ecofeminist prehistories: Ideology and empiricism in Indo-European archaeology. In Kohl, P. R., and Fawcett, C. (ed.), Nationalism, Politics and the Practice of Archaeology, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 82–96.Google Scholar
  4. Anthony, D. W. (2010). The Horse, the Wheel and Language: How Bronze Age Riders from the Eurasian Steppes Shaped the Modern World, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Băčvarov, K. (1997). Geräte. In Hiller, S., and Nikolov, V. (ed.), Karanovo. Die Ausgrabungen im Südsektor 1984-1992, Österreichisch-Bulgarische Forschungen in Karanovo 2, Berger & Söhne, Salzburg, pp. 135–147.Google Scholar
  6. Bar-Adon, P. (1980). The Cave of the Treasure: The finds from the Caves in Nahal Mishmar, Israel Prehistoric Society, Jerusalem.Google Scholar
  7. Barkai, R. (2005). PPNA Stone and Flint Axes as Cultural Markers: Technological, Functional, and Symbolic Aspects, Ex Oriente, Berlin.Google Scholar
  8. Barner, W. (1957). Von Kultäxten, Beilzaubern und rituellem Bohren. Die Kunde N.F. 8: 175–186.Google Scholar
  9. Bartelheim, M. (2009). Metallurgie und Gesellschaft in der Frühbronzezeit Mitteleuropas. In Müller, J. (ed.), Vom Endneolithikum zur Frühbronzezeit. Muster sozialen Wandels? Universitätsforschungen zur Prähistorischen Archäologie 90, Habelt, Bonn, pp. 29–43.Google Scholar
  10. Bartelheim, M. (2013). Innovation and tradition: The structure of the early metal production in the north alpine region. In Burmeister, S., Hansen, S., Kunst, M., and Müller-Scheeßel, N. (ed.), Metal Matters: Innovative Technologies and Social Change in Prehistory and Antiquity, Menschen - Kulturen - Traditionen: ForschungsCluster 2, 12, Marie Leidorf, Rahden, pp. 169–180.Google Scholar
  11. Becker, V., and Thomas, M. (2011). Ausgewählte Kleinfunde aus Drama, Fundstelle “Merdžumekja-Südosthang.” Typologie und stratigraphischer Kontext. In Beier, H.-J., Einicke, J., and Biermann, E. (eds.), Varia Neolithica 7. Dechsel, Axt, Beil & Co. Werkzeug, Waffe, Kultgegenstand? Aktuelles aus der Neolithforschung, Beiträge der Tagung der Arbeitsgemeinschaft Werkzeuge, and Waffen im Archäologischen Zentrum Hitzacker 2010 und Aktuelles. Beiträge zur Ur- und Frühgeschichte Mitteleuropas 63, Beier & Beran, Langenweissbach, pp. 105–146.Google Scholar
  12. Blanton, R., Feinman, G. M., Kowalewski, S. A., and Peregrine, P. N. (1996). A dual-processual theory for the evolution of Mesoamerican civilization. Current Anthropology 37,:1–14, 65–68.Google Scholar
  13. Borić, D. (2009). Absolute dating of metallurgical innovations in the Vinča culture of the Balkans. In Kienlin, T., and Roberts, B. (eds.), Metals and Societies: Studies in Honour of Barbara S. Ottaway, Universitätsforschungen zur Prähistorischen Archäologie 169, Habelt, Bonn, pp. 191–245.Google Scholar
  14. Boroffka, N. (2009). Simple technology: Casting moulds for axe-adzes. In Kienlin, T., and Roberts, B. (eds.), Metals and Societies: Studies in Honour of Barbara S. Ottaway, Universitätsforschungen zur Prähistorischen Archäologie 169, Habelt, Bonn, pp. 246–257.Google Scholar
  15. Bourdieu, P. (1979). La distinction: Critique sociale du jugement, Fayard, Paris.Google Scholar
  16. Bradley, R., and Edmonds, M. (1993). Interpreting the Axe Trade, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  17. Brandt, K. H. (1967). Studien über steinerne Äxte und Beile der Jüngeren Steinzeit und der Steinkupferzeit Nordwestdeutschlands, Münstersche Beiträge zur Vorgeschichtsforschung 2, Lax, Hildesheim.Google Scholar
  18. Brandherm, D., Heymans, E., and Hofmann, D. (2018). Comparing currency and circulation systems in past societies. In Brandherm, D., Heymans, E., and Hofmann, D. (eds.), Gifts, Goods and Money, Archaeopress, Oxford, pp. 1–8.Google Scholar
  19. Burmeister, S., and Müller-Scheeßel, N. (2013). Innovation as a multi-faceted social process: An outline. In Burmeister, S., Hansen, S., Kunst, M., and Müller-Scheeßel, N. (eds.), Metal Matters: Innovative Technologies and Social Change in Prehistory and Antiquity, Menschen - Kulturen - Traditionen: ForschungsCluster 2, 12, Marie Leidorf, Rahden, pp. 1–12.Google Scholar
  20. Cassen, S. (1991). Les débuts du IVe millénaire en centre-ouest: l’hypothèse du Matignons ancien. In Beeching, A., Binder, D., Blanchet, J.-C., Constantin, C., Dubouloz, J., Martinez, R., Mordant, D., Thevenot, J.-P., and Vaquer. J. (eds.), Identitée du chasséen: Actes du Colloque International de Nemours 1989, Mémoirs du Museum de la Préhistoire d’Ile de France 4, Association pour la Promotion de la Recherche Archéologique en Ile-de-France, Nemours, pp. 111–120.Google Scholar
  21. Cassen S., Petrequin, P., Boujot, Ch., Dominguez-Bella, S., Guiavarc’h, M., and Querre, G. (2011). Measuring distinction in the megalithic architecture of the Carnac region: From sign to material. In Furholt, M. (ed.), Megaliths and Identitites. Early Monuments and Neolithic Societies from Atlantic to the Baltic: 3rd European Megalithic Studies Group Meeting, 13th-15th of May 2010 Kiel University, von Zabern, Mainz, pp. 225–248.Google Scholar
  22. Cepгeeв, Г. П. (1963). Ρaннeтpипoльcкий клaд y c. Кapвyнa. Coвeтcкaя Apxeoлoгия 1: 135–151.Google Scholar
  23. Chapman, J. (1998). The impact of modern invasion theory and migrations on archaeological explanation: A biographical sketch of Marija Gimbutas. In Diaz-Andreu, M., and Stig Sørensen, M. (eds.), Excavating Women: A History of Women in European Archaeology, Routledge, London, pp. 295–314.Google Scholar
  24. Childe, V. G. (1947). The Dawn of European Civilization, Routledge and Keegan, London.Google Scholar
  25. Childe, V. G. (1951). Social Evolution, Watts and Co, London.Google Scholar
  26. Comşa, E. (1973–1975). Silexul de Tip “Balcanic.” Peuce 4: 5–19.Google Scholar
  27. Czekaj-Zastawny, A., Kabaciński, J., and Terberger, T. (2011). Long distance exchange in the central European Neolithic: Hungary to the Baltic. Antiquity 85: 43–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Fischer A., Clemmensen, L. B., Donahue, R., Heinemeier, J., Lykke-Andersen, H., Lysdahl, P., Fischer Mortensen, M., Olsen, J., and Vang Petersen, P. (2013). Late Palaeolithic Nørre Lyngby: A northern outpost close to the west coast of Europe. Quartär 60: 137–162. doi: 10.7485, QU60_7Google Scholar
  29. Fol, A., and Lichardus, J. (eds.) (1988). Macht, Herrschaft und Gold: Das Gräberfeld von Varna (Bulgarien) und die Anfänge einer neuen Zivilisation, Stiftung Saarländischer Kulturbesitz, Saarbrücken.Google Scholar
  30. Garfinkel, Y., Klimscha, F., Rosenberg, D., and Shalev, S. (2014). The beginning of metallurgy in the southern Levant: A copper awl from a late 6th millennium CalBC Tel Tsaf, Israel. PLoS One March 26, 2014 [ https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0092591].
  31. Gimbutas, M. (1974) The Goddesses and Gods of Old Europe, Thames and Hudson, London.Google Scholar
  32. Godelier, M. (1996). L’Enigme du Don, Fayard, Paris.Google Scholar
  33. Görsdorf, J., and Bojadžiev, J. (1996). Zur absoluten Chronologie der bulgarischen Urgeschichte. Berliner 14C-Datierungen von bulgarischen archäologischen Fundplätzen. Eurasia Antiqua 2: 105–173.Google Scholar
  34. Govedarica, B. (2010). Spuren von Fernbeziehungen in Norddeutschland während des 5. Jahrtausends v. Chr. Das Altertum 55: 1–12.Google Scholar
  35. Govedarica, B. (2016). Das Phänomen der balkanischen Kupferzeit. In Nikolov, V., and Schier, W. (eds.), Der Schwarzmeerraum vom Neolithikum bis in die Früheisenzeit (6000-600 v. Chr.): Kulturelle Interferenzen in der zirkumpontischen Zone und Kontakte mit Ihren Nachbargebieten, Marie Leidorf, Rahden, pp. 11–22.Google Scholar
  36. Grisse, A. (2006). Früh- und mittelkupferzeitliche Streitäxte im westlichen Mitteleuropa, Habelt, Bonn.Google Scholar
  37. Gurova, M., Andreeva, P., Stefanova, E., Stefanov, Y., Kočić, M., and Borić, D. (2016). Flint raw material transfers in the prehistoric Lower Danube Basin: An integrated analytical approach. Journal of Archaeologcial Science: Reports 5: 422–441.Google Scholar
  38. Haak, W., Lazaridis, I., Patterson, N., Rohland, N., Mallick, S., Llamas, B., et al. (2015). Massive migration from the steppe was a source for Indo-European languages in Europe. Nature 522: 207–211.Google Scholar
  39. Hahn, J. (1993). Erkennen und Bestimmen von Stein und Knochenartefakten: Einführung in die Artefaktmorphologie, Archeologica Venatoria 10, Verlag Archaeologica Venatoria, Tübingen.Google Scholar
  40. Hansen, S. (2002). “Überausstattungen” in Gräbern und Horten der Frühbronzezeit. In Müller, J. (ed.), Vom Endneolithikum zur Frühbronzezeit: Muster sozialen Wandels? Universitätsforschungen zur prähistorischen Archäologie 90, Habelt, Bonn, pp. 151–173.Google Scholar
  41. Hansen, S. (2007). Bilder vom Menschen der Steinzeit: Untersuchungen zur anthropomorphen Plastik der Jungsteinzeit und Kupferzeit in Südosteuropa. Archäologie in Eurasien 20, von Zabern, Mainz.Google Scholar
  42. Hansen, S. (2011). Innovation Metall: Kupfer, Gold und Silber in Südosteuropa während des fünften und vierten Jahrtausends v. Chr. Das Altertum 56: 275–314.Google Scholar
  43. Hansen, S. (2013). Innovative metals: Copper, gold and silver in the Black Sea region and the Carpathian Basin during the 5th and 4th millennium BC. In Burmeister, S., Hansen, S., Kunst, M., and Müller-Scheeßel, N. (eds.), Metal Matters: Innovative Technologies and Social Change in Prehistory and Antiquity, Menschen - Kulturen - Traditionen: ForschungsCluster 2, 12, Marie Leidorf, Rahden, pp. 137–167.Google Scholar
  44. Hansen, S. (2015). Pietrele—Lakeside settlement, 5200–4250 BC. In Hansen, S., Raczky, P., Anders, A., and Reingruber, A. (eds.), Neolithic and Copper Age between the Carpathians and the Aegean Sea: Chronologies and Technologies from the 6th to 4th Millennium BC, International Workshop Budapest 2012, Habelt, Bonn, pp. 273–294.Google Scholar
  45. Hansen, S. (2017). Key techniques in the production of metals in the 6th and 5th millennia BCE: Prerequisites, preconditions and consequences. In Maran, J., and Stockhammer, P. (eds.), Appropriating Innovations: Entangled Knowledge in Eurasia, 5000–1500 BC, Oxbow, Oxford, pp. 136–148.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Hansen S., Toderaş, M., Reingruber, A., Gatsov, I., Klimscha, F., Nedelcheva, P., et al. (2008). Der kupferzeitliche Siedlungshügel Măgura Gorgana bei Pietrele in der Walachei: Ergebnisse der Ausgrabungen im Sommer 2007. Eurasia Antiqua 14: 19–100.Google Scholar
  47. Helwing, B. (2013) Early metallurgy in Iran: An innovative region as seen from the inside. In Burmeister, S., Hansen, S., Kunst, M., and Müller-Scheeßel, N. (eds.), Metal Matters: Innovative Technologies and Social Change in Prehistory and Antiquity, Menschen - Kulturen - Traditionen: ForschungsCluster 2, 12, Marie Leidorf, Rahden, p. 105–136.Google Scholar
  48. Helwing, B. (2017). A comparative view on metallurgical innovations in south-western Asia: What came first? In Maran, J., and Stockhammer, P. (eds.), Appropriating Innovations: Entangled Knowledge in Eurasia, 5000–1500 BC, Oxbow, Oxford, pp. 161–171.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Hiller, S., and Nikolov, N. (eds.) (1997). Karanovo: Die Ausgrabungen im Südsektor 1984–1992, Berger and Söhne, Salzburg.Google Scholar
  50. Hiller, S., and Nikolov, N. (eds.) (2005). Karanovo IV: Die Ausgrabungen im Nordsüdschnitt, 1993–1999, Phoibos, Vienna.Google Scholar
  51. Hösch, E. (2002). Geschichte der Balkanlander: Von der Frühzeit bis zur Gegenwart, Beck, Munich.Google Scholar
  52. Højlund, F. (1978). Stenøkser i Ny Guineas Hojlund. Hikuin 4: 31–48.Google Scholar
  53. Jensen, G. (1991). Unusable axes? An experiment with antler axes of the Kongemose and Ertebølle cultures. Experimental Archaeology 1: 9–21.Google Scholar
  54. Jeunesse, Ch., and van Willigen, S. (2010). Westmediterranes Frühneolithikum und westliche Linearbandkeramik: Impulse, Unteraktionen, Mischkulturen. In Gronenborn, D., and Petrasch, J. (eds.), Die Neolithisierung Mitteleuropas, Internationale Tagung, Mainz 24. bis 26. Juni 2005, von Zabern, Mainz, pp. 570–605.Google Scholar
  55. Kahn, C. (2007). Die bandkeramischen Siedlungen im oberen Schlangengrabental: Studien zur bandkeramischen Besiedlung der Aldenhovener Platte, Rheinische Ausgrabungen 57, von Zabern, Mainz.Google Scholar
  56. Kelterborn, P. (1992). Eine Beilwerkstatt im Seegubel, Jona SG. Jahrbuch der Schweizerischen Gesellschaft für Ur- und Frühgeschichte 75: 133–138.Google Scholar
  57. Kienlin, T. (1999). Vom Stein zur Bronze: Zur soziokulturellen Deutung früher Metallurgie in der englischen Theoriediskussion, Tübinger Texte 2, Leidorf, Rahden.Google Scholar
  58. Kienlin, T. (2008). Von Schmieden und Stämmen: Anmerkungen zur Kupferzeitlichen Metallurgie Südosteuropas. Germania 86: 503–540.Google Scholar
  59. Klassen, L., and Pernicka, E. (1998). Eine kreuzschneidige Axthacke aus Südskandinavien? Ein Beispiel für die Anwendungsmöglichkeiten der Stuttgarter Analysedatenbank. Archäologisches Korrespondenzblatt 28: 35–45.Google Scholar
  60. Kienlin, T., and Roberts, B. (eds.) (2009). Metals and Societies: Studies in Honor of Barbara S. Ottaway, Universitätsforschungen zur Prähistorischen Archäologie 169, Habelt, Bonn.Google Scholar
  61. Kienlin, T., and Zimmermann, A. (eds.) (2012). Beyond Elites: Alternatives to Hierarchical Systems in Modelling Social Formations, Universitätsforschungen zur Prähistorischen Archäologie 215, Habelt, Bonn.Google Scholar
  62. Klassen, L. (1999). Prestigeøkser af sjældne alpine bjergarter: En glemt og overset fundgruppe fra ældre stenalders slutning i Danmark. Kuml 1999: 11–51.Google Scholar
  63. Klassen, L. (2000). Frühes Kupfer im Norden: Chronologie, Herkunft und Bedeutung der Kupferfunde der Nordgruppe der Trichterbecherkultur, Jysk Arkeologisk Selskab, Århus.Google Scholar
  64. Klassen, L. (2004). Jade und Kupfer: Untersuchungen zum Neolithisierungsprozess im westlichen Ostseeraum unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Kulturentwicklung Europas 5500–3500 BC, Jysk Arkeologisk Selskab, Århus.Google Scholar
  65. Klimscha, F. (2007). Die Verbreitung und Datierung kupferzeitlicher Silexbeile in Südosteuropa. Fernbeziehungen neolithischer Gesellschaften im 5. und 4. Jahrtausend v. Chr. Germania 85: 275–305.Google Scholar
  66. Klimscha, F. (2010). Production and use of flint and ground stone axes at Magura Gorgana near Pietrele, Giurgiu county, Romania. Lithics 31: 55–67.Google Scholar
  67. Klimscha, F. (2011). Flint axes, ground stone axes and “battle axes” of the Copper Age in the Eastern Balkans (Romania, Bulgaria). In Davids, V., and Edmonds, M. (eds.), Stone Axe Studies III, Oxbow, Oxford, pp. 361–382.Google Scholar
  68. Klimscha, F. (2013). Innovations in Chalcolithic metallurgy in the Southern Levant during the 5th and 4th millennium BC: Copper-production at Tall Hujayrat al-Ghuzlan and Tall al-Magass, Aqaba Area, Jordan. In Burmeister, S., Hansen, S., Kunst, M., and Müller-Scheeßel, N. (eds.), Metal Matters: Innovative Technologies and Social Change in Prehistory and Antiquity, Menschen - Kulturen - Traditionen: ForschungsCluster 2, 12, Marie Leidorf, Rahden, pp. 31–64.Google Scholar
  69. Klimscha, F. (2015). Ages and stages of copper: A comparative approach to the social implementation of metal production and artefacts during 5th and 4th millennium in the Levant and the Balkan Peninsula. In Rosinska-Balik, K., Dębowska-Ludwin, J., and Czarnowicz, M. (eds.), Copper and Trade in the South-Eastern Mediterranean: Trade Routes of the Near East in Antiquity, BAR International Series 2753, Oxbow, Oxford, pp. 39–52.Google Scholar
  70. Klimscha, F. (2016). Pietrele I: Beile und Äxte aus Stein: Distinktion und Kommunikation in der Kupferzeit im östlichen Balkangebiet (5. und 4. Jahrtausend), Archäologie in Eurasien 34, Habelt, Bonn.Google Scholar
  71. Klimscha, F. (2017). The diffusion of know-how within spheres of interaction: Modelling prehistoric innovation processes between south-west Asia and central Europe in the 5th and 4th millennium. In Maran, J., and Stockhammer, P. (eds.), Appropriating Innovations: Entangled Knowledge in Eurasia, 5000–1500 BC, Oxbow, Oxford, pp. 149–160.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Klimscha, F., and Nowak, K. (2009). “Donnerkeile”—Die (post)neolithische Verwendung steinerner Beile als Talisman, Medizin und Co. Museumsjournal Natur und Mensch 2009: 31–43.Google Scholar
  73. Kozlowski, S. (2008). Thinking Mesolithic, Oxbow, Oxford.Google Scholar
  74. Krauß, R., Schmid, C., Kirschenheuter, D., Abele, J., Slavchev, V., and Weninger, B. (2017). Chronology and development of the Chalcolithic Necropolis of Varna. Documenta Praehistorica 44: 282–305.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Krauß, R., Zäuner, S., and Pernicka, E. (2014). Statistical and anthropological analysis of the Varna Necropolis. In Meller, H., Risch, R., and Pernicka, E. (eds.), Metalle der Macht: Frühes Gold und Silber, 6. Mitteldeutscher Archäologentag vom 17. bis 19. Oktober 2013 in Halle (Saale), Tagungen des Landesmuseums Halle 11, Landesmuseum für Vorgeschichte, Halle, pp. 371–387.Google Scholar
  76. La Baume, W. (1951). Grundsätzliches zur Form und Technik des Steinbeiles und beilähnlicher Geräte der Steinzeit. In Kersten, K. (ed.), Festschrift für G. Schwantes zum 65. Geburtstag dargebracht von seinen Schülern und Freunden, Karl Wacholtz, Neumünster, pp. 110–115.Google Scholar
  77. Leusch, V., Pernicka, E., and Armbruster, B. (2014). Chalcolithic gold from Varna: Provenance, circulation, processing and function. In Meller, H., Risch, R., and Pernicka, E. (eds.), Metalle der Macht: Frühes Gold und Silber 6: Mitteldeutscher Archäologentag vom 17. bis 19. Oktober 2013 in Halle (Saale), Tagungen des Landesmuseums Halle 11, Landesmuseum für Vorgeschichte, Halle, pp. 165–182.Google Scholar
  78. Leusch, V., Pernicka, E., and Krauß, R. (2016). Zusammensetzung und Technologie der Goldfunde aus dem Chalkolithischen Gräberfeld von Varna I. In Nikolov, V., and Schier, W. (eds.), Der Schwarzmeerraum vom Neolithikum bis in die Früheisenzeit (6000–600 v. Chr.): Kulturelle Interferenzen in der zirkumpontischen Zone und Kontakte mit ihren Nachbargebieten, Prähistorische Archäologie in Südosteuropa 30, Marie Leidorf, Rahden, pp. 165–182.Google Scholar
  79. Leusch, V., Zäuner, S., Slavchev, V., Krauß, R., Armbruster, B., and Pernicka, E. (2017). Rich metallurgists’(?) graves from the Varna I cemetery: Rediscussing the social role of the earliest metalworkers. In Brysbaert, A., and Gorgues, A. (eds.) Artisans versus Nobility, Leiden University Press, Leiden, pp. 101–124.Google Scholar
  80. Lévi-Strauss, C. (1949). Les structures élémentaires de la parenté, La Haye, Paris.Google Scholar
  81. Lichardus, J. (ed.) (1991), Die Kupferzeit als historische Epoche: Symposium Saarbrucken und Otzenhausen 6.–13.11.1988, Habelt, Bonn.Google Scholar
  82. Lichardus, J., and Lichardus-Itten, M. (1993). Das Grab von Reka Devnja (Nordostbulgarien): Ein Beitrag zu den Beziehungen zwischen Nord- und Westpontikum in der frühen Kupferzeit. Saarbrücker Studien und Materialien zur Altertumskunde 2: 9–99.Google Scholar
  83. Lichardus, J., Fol, A., Getov, L., Bertemes, F., Echt, R., Katinčarov, R., and Krăštev Iliev, J. (2000). Forschungen in der Mikroregion von Drama (Südostbulgarien): Zusammenfassung der Hauptergebnisse der deutsch-bulgarischen Grabungen in den Jahren 1983–1999, Habelt, Bonn.Google Scholar
  84. Lichter, C. (2001). Untersuchungen zu den Bestattungssitten des südosteuropäischen Neolithikums und Chalkolithikums, von Zabern, Mainz.Google Scholar
  85. Lichter, C. (2008). Varna und İkiztepe: Überlegungen zu zwei Fundplätzen am Schwarzen Meer. In Slavchev, V. (ed.), The Varna Eneolithic Necropolis and Problems in Prehistory in Southeast Europe: Studia in Memoriam Ivani Ivanov, Acta Musei Varnaensis 6: 177–194.Google Scholar
  86. Lichter, C. (2015). Von Jägern und Sammlern – oder – Das kleine Spiel. Archäologische Informationen 38: 263–315.  https://doi.org/10.11588/ai.2015.1.26193
  87. Lüth, P. (2003). Sekundäre Überarbeitung dünnackiger Flintbeile der Trichterbecherkultur im nördlichen Schleswig Holstein. Journal of Neolithic Archaeology 5  https://doi.org/10.12766/jna.2003.5
  88. Makkay, J. (1976). Problems concerning Copper Age chronology in the Carpathian Basin: Copper Age gold pendants and gold discs in central and south-east Europe. Acta Archaeologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae 28: 251–300.Google Scholar
  89. Malmer, M. (1962). Jungneolithische Studien, Habelt, Bonn.Google Scholar
  90. Maнoлaкaкиc, Л. (2002). Фyнкзияaтa нa гoлeмитe плacтини oт Bapнeнcкия нeкpoпoл. Apxeoлoгия (Coфия) 43: 5–17.Google Scholar
  91. Mathieson, I., Lazaridis, I., Rohland, N., Mallick, S., Patterson, N., Alpaslan Roodenberg, S., et al. (2015). Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians. Nature 528/7583, 499–503.  https://doi.org/10.1038/nature16152 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  92. Mauss, M. (1925). Essai sur le don: Forme et raison de l’échange dans les sociétés archaïques. L’Année Sociologique N.S. 1, 1923–1924: 31–180.Google Scholar
  93. Meller, H., Hahn, H. P., Jung, R., and Risch, R. (eds.) (2016). Arm und Reich: Zur Ressourcenverwendung in prähistorischen Gesellschafte, 8: Mitteldeutscher Archäologentag vom 22. Bis 24. Oktober in Halle, Tagungen des Landesmuseums für Vorgeschichte Halle (Saale) 14, Landesmuseum für Vorgeschichte Halle, Halle.Google Scholar
  94. Morgado, A., and Pelegin, J. (2012). Origin and development of pressure blade production in the southern Iberian Peninsula (6th–3rd millennia BC) In Desrosiers, P. M. (ed.), The Emergence of Pressure Blade Making: From Origin to Modern Experimentation, Springer, Boston, MA, pp. 219–235.Google Scholar
  95. Much, M. (1886). Die Kupferzeit in Europa und ihr Verhältnis zur Cultur der Indogermanen, Kaiserlich-Königlichen Hof- und Staatdruckerei, Vienna.Google Scholar
  96. Müller, J. (1994). Das Ostadriatische Frühneolithikum: Die Impresso-Kultur und die Neolithisierung des Adriaraumes, Prähistorische Archaologie in Südosteuropa 9, Spiess, Berlin.Google Scholar
  97. Müller, M. (2015). On the distribution of different types of anthropomorphic figurines of the Copper Age on the Eastern Balkan Peninsula and the Lower Danube Valley. In Hansen, S., Raczky, P., Anders, A., and Reingruber, A. (eds.), Neolithic and Copper Age between the Carpathians and the Aegean Sea: Chronologies and Technologies from the 6th to 4th Millennium BC, International Workshop Budapest 2012, Habelt, Bonn, pp. 353–367.Google Scholar
  98. Müller, S. (1905). Urgeschichte Europas: Grundzüge einer prähistorischen Archäologie, De Gruyter Strassburg.Google Scholar
  99. Nielsen, P. O. (1977). Die Flintbeile der frühen Trichterbecherkultur in Dänemark. Acta Archaeologica (København) 48: 61–138.Google Scholar
  100. Oppitz, M. (1988) Frau für Fron, Suhrkamp, Frankfurt am Main.Google Scholar
  101. Oppitz, M. (1991). Onkels Tochter, Keine Sonst. Heiratsbündnis und Denkweise in einer Lokalkultur des Himalaya, Suhrkamp, Frankfurt am Main.Google Scholar
  102. Parzinger, H. (1992). Hornstaad – Hlinsko – Stollhof: Zur absoluten Datierung eines vor-Baden-zeitlichen Horizontes. Germania 70: 241–250.Google Scholar
  103. Păunescu, A. (1970). Evoluţia uneltor şi armelor depiatră cioplită descoperite pe teritoriul Romaniei, Bibliotheca de Arheologie 15, Editura Academiei Republicii Socialiste Romana, Bucureşti.Google Scholar
  104. Pelegrin, J., and Richard, A. (eds.) (1995). Les mines de silex au Néolithique en Europe: Avancées récentes, Actes de la table ronde internationale de Vesoul: Les minières de Silex Néolithique en Europe Occidentale, 18–19 oct. 1991, Edition du CHTS, Paris.Google Scholar
  105. Petersen, P. V. (1984). Chronological and regional variation in the late Mesolithic of eastern Denmark. Journal of Danish Archaeology 3: 7–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  106. Pétrequin P., Gauthier, E., and Pétrequin, A.-M. (2010). Les haches en silex de type Glis-Weisweil en France, en Suisse et en Allemagne du sud-ouest: Des imitations de haches alpines à la transition Ve-IVe millénaires. In Matuschik, I., Strahm, C., and Eberschweiler, B. (eds.), Vernetzungen: Aspekte siedlungsarchäologischer Forschung: Festschrift für Helmut Schlichterle zum 60, Geburtstag, Lavori, Freiburg im Breisgau, pp. 237–252.Google Scholar
  107. Pétrequin, P., Errera, M., Cassen, S., Gauthier, E., Hovorka, D., Klassen, L., and Sheridan, A. (2011). From Mount Viso to Slovakia: The two axeheads from Alpine Jade from Golianovo. Acta Archaeologica Academia Scientiarum Hungaricae 62: 243–268.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  108. Pétrequin P., Cassen, S., Errera, M., Tsonev, T., Dimitrov, K., Klassen, L. and Mitkova, R. (2012). Les Haches en «jade alpins» en Bulgarie. In Pétrequin, P., Cassen, S., Errera, M., Klassen, L., Sheridan, A., and Pétrequin, A.-M. (eds.), Jade: Grandes haches alpines du Néolithique européen: Ve et IVe millénaires av. J.-C., Presses Universitaire de Franche-Comté, Besançon, pp. 1231–1269.Google Scholar
  109. Piezonka, H. (2015). Jäger, Fischer, Töpfer. Wildbeutergruppen mit früher Keramik in Nordosteuropa im 6. und frühen 5. Jahrtausend v. Chr., Archäologie in Eurasien 30, Habelt, Bonn.Google Scholar
  110. Polanyi, K. (1944). The Great Transformation: The Political and Economic Origins of Our Time, Farrar and Rinhard, New York.Google Scholar
  111. Pulszky, F. von (1884). Die Kupferzeit in Ungarn. Ungarische Revue 6: 386–437.Google Scholar
  112. Raczky, P., and Siklósi, Z. (2013). A consideration of the Copper Age chronology of the eastern Carpathian Basin: A Bayesian approach. Journal of Archaeological Science 40: 874–882.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  113. Radivojević, M., and Rehren, T. (2016). Paint it black: The rise of metallurgy in the Balkans. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory 22: 1–38.Google Scholar
  114. Radivojević, M., Rehren, T., Kuzmanović-Cvetković, J., Jovanović, M., and Northover, J. P. (2013). Tainted ores and the rise of tin bronze metallurgy, c. 6500 years ago. Antiquity 87: 1030–1045.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  115. Radivojević, M., Rehren, Th., Pernicka, E., Šljivar, D., Brauns, M., and Borić, D. (2010). On the origins of extractive metallurgy: New evidence from Europe. Journal of Archaeological Science 37: 2775–2787.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  116. Rech, M. (1979). Studien zu den Depotfunden der Trichterbecher-und Einzelgrabkultur des Nordens, Offa Bücher 39, Wachholtz, Neumünster.Google Scholar
  117. Reingruber, A. (2008). Die Argissa Magula. Das frühe und das beginnende Neolithikum im Lichte transägäischer Beziehungen: Die deutschen Ausgrabungen auf der Argissa Magula II, Beiträge zur ur- und frühgeschichtlichen Archäologie des Mittelmeerraums 35, Habelt, Bonn.Google Scholar
  118. Reingruber, A. (2010). Keramische Hausinventare des 5. Jahrtausends v. Chr. aus Pietrele, Rumänien. In Kalábková, P., Kovár, B., Pavúk P., and Šuteková, J. (eds.), Panta Rhei: Studies in the Chronology and Cultural Development of South-Eastern and Central Europe in Earlier Prehistory Presented to Juraj Pavúk on the Occasion of his 75th Birthday, Studia Archaeologia et Mediaevalia 11, Cornelius University, Bratislava, pp. 131–142.Google Scholar
  119. Reingruber, A. (2011). Soziale Differenzierung in Pietrele. In Hansen, S., and Müller, J. (eds.), Sozialarchäologische Perspektiven: Gesellschaftlicher Wandel 5000-1500 v. Chr. zwischen Atlantik und Kaukasus, Archäologie in Eurasien 24, von Zabern, Mainz, pp. 43–55.Google Scholar
  120. Reingruber, A. (2014). The wealth of the tells: Complex settlement patterns and specialisations in the West Pontic area between 4600 and 4250 calBC. In Horejs, B., and Mehofer, M. (eds.), Western Anatolia before Troy: Proto-Urbanisation in the 4th Millennium BC? Proceedings of the International Symposium held at the Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, Vienna, Austria, 21-24 November 2012, Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna, pp. 217–242.Google Scholar
  121. Reingruber, A., and Rassamakin, Y. (2016). Zwischen Donau und Kuban. Das nordpontische Steppengebiet im 5. Jt. v. Chr. In Hänsel, B., and Schier, W. (eds.), Der Schwarzmeerraum vom Neolithikum bis in die Früheisenzeit (6000-600 v. Chr.): Kulturelle Beziehungen in der Zirkumpontischen Zone und Kontakte mit ihren Nachbargebieten. Prähistorische Archäologie in Südosteuropa 30, Leidorf, Rahden/Westf., pp. 273–310.Google Scholar
  122. Renfrew, C. (1969). The autonomy of the south-east European Copper Age. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 1969: 12–47.Google Scholar
  123. Renfrew, C. (1973) Before Civilization: The Radiocarbon Revolution and Prehistoric Europe, Cape, London.Google Scholar
  124. Renfrew, C. (1990). Archaeology and Language: The Puzzle of Indo-European Origins, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  125. Roberts, B. W., Thornton, C. P., and Pigott, V. C. (2009). Development of metallurgy in Eurasia. Antiquity 83: 1012–1022.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  126. Röder, B., Hummel, J., and Kunz, B. (1996). Göttinnendämmerung: Das Matriarchat aus Archäologischer Sicht, Königsfurt Urania, Munich.Google Scholar
  127. Rosenstock, E., Scharl, S., and Schier, W. (2016). Ex Oriente Lux? Ein Diskussionsbeitrag zur Stellung der frühen Kupfermetallurgie Südosteuropas. In Bartelheim, M., Horejs, B., and Krauß, R. (eds.), Von Baden bis Troia: Ressourcennutzung, Metallurgie und Wissenstransfer, Oriental and European Archaeology 3, Marie Leidorf, Rahden, pp. 59–122.Google Scholar
  128. Scharl, S. (2016). Patterns of innovation transfer and the spread of copper metallurgy to central Europe. European Journal of Archaeology 19: 215–244.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  129. Schubert, F. (1965). Zu den sudosteuropäischen Kupferäxten. Germania 43: 274–295.Google Scholar
  130. Schuchhardt, C. (1919). Alteuropa und seine Kulturen, Trübner, Straßburg.Google Scholar
  131. Schuchhardt, C. (1941). Alteuropa. Die Entwicklung seiner Kulturen und Völker, de Gruyter, Berlin.Google Scholar
  132. Šiška, S. (1964). Phrebisko tiszapolgarskej kultury v Tibave. Slovenska Archeologia 12: 293–356.Google Scholar
  133. Stenzler, F. (1979). Versuch über den Tausch. Zur Kritik des Strukturalismus, Medusa, Berlin.Google Scholar
  134. Terberger, T., Hartz, S., and Kabacinski, J. (2009). Late hunter-gatherer and early farmer contacts in the southern Baltic—A discussion. In Glorstad, H., and Prescott, C. (eds.), Neolithisation—as if History mattered: Processes of Neolithization in North-Western Europe, Bricoleur Press, Lindome, pp. 257–298.Google Scholar
  135. Thirault, E. (2004). Echanges néolithiques: Les haches alpines, Editions Mergoil, Montagnac.Google Scholar
  136. Thomson, D. W. (1964). Wood and stone implements of the Bindibu tribe of central western Australia. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society N.S. 30: 400–422.Google Scholar
  137. Todorova, H. (1978). The Eneolithic Period in Bulgaria in the Fifth Millennium BC, BAR International Series 49, Archaeopress, Oxford.Google Scholar
  138. Todorova, H. (1981). Die kupferzeitlichen Äxte und Beile in Bulgarien, Prähistorische Bronzefunde (PBF) IX, 14, Beck, Munich.Google Scholar
  139. Todorova, H. (1982). Kupferzeitliche Siedlungen in Nordostbulgarien, Materialien zur Allgemeinen und Vergleichenden Archäologie 13, Beck, Munich.Google Scholar
  140. Todorova, H. (ed.) (2002). Die prähistorischen Gräberfelder: Durankulak 2, Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Berlin.Google Scholar
  141. Vizdal, J. (1977). Tiszapolgarske pohrebisko vo Vel’kych Raškovciach, Zemplínske Múzeum v Michalovciach, Košice.Google Scholar
  142. Vulpe, A. (1975). Die Äxte und Beile in Rumänien, Prähistorische Bronzefunde (PBF) IX, 2, Beck, Munich.Google Scholar
  143. Weiner, J. (2012). Neolithische Beilklingen aus Feuerstein. In Floss, H. (ed.) Steinartefakte vom Paläolithikum bis in die Neuzeit, Kerns Verlag, Tübingen, pp. 827–835.Google Scholar
  144. Weller, U. (2014). Äxte und Beile. Erkennen, bestimmen, beschreiben, Bestimmungsbuch Archäologie 2, Deutscher Kunstverlag, Berlin.Google Scholar
  145. Weninger, B., Reingruber, A., and Hansen, S. (2010). Konstruktion eines stratigraphischen Altersmodells für die Radiocarbondaten aus Pietrele, Rumänien. In Šuteková, J., Pavúk, P., Kalábková, P., and Kovár, B. (eds.), Pantha Rhei: Studies on the Chronology and Cultural Development of South-Eastern and Central Europe in Earlier Prehistory: Presented to Juraj Pavúk on the Occasion of his 75th Birthday, Cornelius University, Bratislava, pp. 141–149.Google Scholar
  146. Wentink, K. (2006). Ceci n’est pas une hache, Neolithic Depositions in the Northern Netherlands, Sidestone Press, Leiden.Google Scholar
  147. Winiger, J. (1981). Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte des Beils. Helvetia Archaeologia 12: 161–188.Google Scholar
  148. Winiger, J. (1991). Zur Formenkunde der Steinbeilklingen. Jahrbuch der Schweizer Gesellschaft für Ur- und Frühgeschichte 74: 79–106.Google Scholar
  149. Yerkes, R., and Barkai, R. (2013), Tree-felling, woodworking, and changing perceptions of the landscape during the Neolithic and Chalcolithic periods in the Southern Levant. Current Anthropology 54: 222–231.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  150. Yerkes, E. W., Barkai, R., Gopher, A., and Bar-Yosef, O. (2003). Microwear analysis of early Neolithic (PPNA) axes and bifacial tools from Netiv Hagdud in the Jordan Valley, Israel. Journal of Archaeological Sciences 30: 1051–1066.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  151. Zalai-Gaál, I., Gal, E., Kohler, K., and Osztas, A. (2011). Das Steingerätedepot aus dem Häuptlingsgrab 3060 der Lengyel- Kultur von Alsonyek, Südtransdanubien. In Beier, H.-J., Einicke, R., and Biermann, E. (eds.), Varia Neolithica 7: Dechsel, Axt, Beil & Co. Werkzeug, Waffe, Kultgegenstand? Aktuelles aus der Neolithforschung, Beiträge der Tagung der Arbeitsgemeinschaft Werkzeuge und Waffen im Archäologischen Zentrum Hitzacker 2010 und Aktuelles, Beiträge zur Ur- und Frühgeschichte Mitteleuropas 63, Beier & Beran, Langenweissbach, pp. 85–103.Google Scholar
  152. Злaтeвa-Узyнoвa, P., and Cлaвчeв, B. (2005). Kpeмъчни Apтeфaкти oт Pyceнcкaтa Ceлищнa Moгилa oт Фoндaнa Peгиoнaлния Иcтopичecки Myзeй-Bapнa. Извecтия. Apxeoлoпия и Иcтo-pия. Peиoнaпeн Иcтopичecки Myзeй-Pyce 9: 19–27.Google Scholar

Bibliography of Recent Literature

  1. Antonović, D. (2009). Prehistoric copper tools from the territory of Serbia. Journal of Mining and Metallurgy 45 (2) B: 165–174.Google Scholar
  2. Antonović, D. (2014). Kupferzeitliche Äxte und Beile in Serbien, Prähistorische Bronzefunde IX, 27, Franz Steiner, Stuttgart.Google Scholar
  3. Bacvarov, K., and Gleser, R. (eds.) (2016). Southeast Europe and Anatolia in Prehistory: Essays in Honor of Vassil Nikolov on his 65th Anniversary, Universitätsforschungen zur Prähistorischen Archäologie 293, Habelt, Bonn.Google Scholar
  4. Beier, H.-J., Einicke, J., and Biermann, E. (eds.) (2011). Varia Neolithica 7: Dechsel, Axt, Beil & Co. Werkzeug, Waffe, Kultgegenstand? Aktuelles aus der Neolithforschung, Beitrage der Tagung der Arbeitsgemeinschaft Werkzeuge und Waffen im Archäologischen Zentrum Hitzacker 2010 und Aktuelles, Beitrage zur Ur- und Frühgeschichte Mitteleuropas 63, Beier & Beran, Langenweissbach.Google Scholar
  5. Boyadzhiev, Y., and Terzijska-Ignatova, S. (eds.) (2011). The Golden Fifth Millennium: Thrace and Its Neighbour Areas in the Chalcolithic: Proceedings of the International Symposium in Pazardzhik, Yundola, 26.–30.10.2009, National Institute of Archaeology and Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia.Google Scholar
  6. Burmeister, S., and Bernbeck, R. (eds.) (2017). The Interplay of People and Technologies: Archaeological Case Studies on Innovation, Edition Topoi, Berlin.Google Scholar
  7. Burmeister, S., Hansen, S, Kunst, M., and Müller-Scheessel, N. (eds.) (2013). Metal Matters: Innovative Technologies and Social Change in Prehistory and Antiquity, Menschen–Kulturen–Traditionen: ForschungsCluster 2 12, Marie Leidorf, Rahden.Google Scholar
  8. Davis, V., and Edmonds, M. (eds.) (2011). Stone Axe Studies III, Oxbow, Oxford.Google Scholar
  9. Floss, H. (ed.) (2012). Steinartefakte vom Paläolithikum bis in die Neuzeit, Kerns Verlag, Tübingen.Google Scholar
  10. Gambashidze, I., and Stöllner, T. (eds.) (2016). The Gold of Sakdrisi: Man’s First Gold Mining Enterprise, Veröffentlichungen aus dem Deutschen Bergbau-Museum Bochum 211, Marie Leidorf, Bochum.Google Scholar
  11. Giligny, F., and Bostyn, F. (2016). La hache de silex dans le Val de Seine: Production et diffusion des haches au Néolithique, Sidestone Press, Leiden.Google Scholar
  12. Guilaine, J. (ed.) (2007), Le Chalcolithique et la construction des inégalités, Editions Errance, Paris.Google Scholar
  13. Hansen, S. (ed.) (2010). Leben auf dem Tell als soziale Praxis: Beiträge des internationalen Symposiums in Berlin vom 26.–27. Februar 2007, Kolloquien zur Vor- und Frühgeschichte 14, Habelt, Bonn.Google Scholar
  14. Hansen, S., and Müller, J. (eds.) (2011). Sozialarchäologische Perspektiven: Gesellschaftlicher Wandel 5000-1500 v. Chr. zwischen Atlantik und Kaukasus, Archäologie in Eurasien 24, von Zabern, Mainz.Google Scholar
  15. Hansen, S., Raczky, P., Anders A., and Reingruber, A. (eds.) (2015). Neolithic and Copper Age between the Carpathians and the Aegean Sea: Chronologies and Technologies from the 6th to 4th Millennium BC: International Workshop Budapest 2012, Habelt, Bonn.Google Scholar
  16. Hansen, S., Renn, J., Klimscha, F., and Büttner, J. (2012–2017). Digital Atlas of Innovations, Berlin, https://www.atlas-innovations.de/en
  17. Hansen, S., Toderaş, M., Wunderlich, J., Beutler, K., Benecke, N., Dittus, A., et al. (2017). Pietrele am “Lacul Gorgana”: Bericht über die Ausgrabungen in der neolithischen und kupferzeitlichen Siedlung und die geomorphologischen Untersuchungen in den Sommern 2012–2016. Eurasia Antiqua 2017: 1–116.Google Scholar
  18. Hofmann, R., Moetz, F.-K., and Müller, J. (eds.) (2012). Tells: Social and Environmental Space: Proceedings of the International Workshop “Socio-Environmental Dynamics over the Last 12,000 Years: The Creation of Landscapes II (14th–18th March 2011)” in Kiel, Universitätsforschungen zur Prähistorischen Archäologie 207, Habelt, Bonn.Google Scholar
  19. Ivanova, M. (2013). The Black Sea and the Early Civilizations of Europe, the Near East, and Asia, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Kegler-Graiewski, N. (2007). Beile–Äxte–Mahlsteine: Zur Rohmaterialversorgung im Jung- und Spätneolithikum Nordhessens, Ph.D. dissertation, Institut für Ur- und Frühgeschichte, Universität zu Köln, Cologne,  https://doi.org/10.11588/ai.2008.1&2.11078.
  21. Klimscha, F. (2014). Die geschliffenen Steingerate der frühneolithischen Siedlung Ovčarovo-Gorata. In Krauß, R. (ed.), Ovčarovo-Gorata, Archäologie in Eurasien 29, von Zabern, Mainz, pp. 175–200.Google Scholar
  22. Klimscha, F. (2014). Power and prestige in the Copper Age of the Lower Danube. In Ştefan, C. E., Florea, M. Ş., and Lazăr, C. A. (eds.), Studii privind Preistoria Sud-Estului Europei. Volum dedicat memoriei lui Mihai Şimon, Editura Istros, Brăila, pp. 131–168.Google Scholar
  23. Klimscha, F. (2018). The diffusion of know-how within spheres of interaction: Modelling prehistoric innovation processes between south-west Asia and central Europe in the 5th and 4th millennium. In Stockhammer, P. W., and Maran, J. (eds.), Appropriating Innovations: Entangled Knowledge in Eurasia, 5000–1500 BCE, Oxbow, Oxford, pp. 149160.Google Scholar
  24. Körlin, G., Prange, M., Stöllner, T., and Yalcin, Ü. (2016) (eds.). From Bright Ores to Shiny Metals: Festschrift for Andreas Hauptmann on the Occasion of 40 Years Research in Archaeometallurgy and Archaeometry, Marie Leidorf, Raden.Google Scholar
  25. Krauß, R. (ed.) (2014). Ovčarovo-Gorata, von Zabern, Mainz.Google Scholar
  26. Krauß, R. (2017). Nordwestanatolien, Balkan und Karpatenbecken im diachronen Vergleich–Kulturkontakt und Kommunikation vom 6.-4. Jt. v. Chr. In Schimmelpfennig, D., and Link, T. (eds.), No Future? Brüche und kulturelle Erscheinungen: Fallbeispiele aus dem 6.-2. Jahrtausend, Fokus Jungsteinzeit–Berichte der AG Neolithikum 5, Welt und Erde, Kerpen-Loogh, pp. 67–88.Google Scholar
  27. Krauß, R., Schmid, C., Kirschenheuter, D., Abele, J., Slavchev, V., and Weninger, B. (2017). Chronology and development of the Chalcolithic necropolis of Varna I. Documenta Praehistorica 44: 282–305.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Labriffe, P.-A., and Thirault, E. (eds.) (2012), Produire des haches au Néolithique, de la matière première à l’abandon, Actes de la Table Ronde SPF, MAN de St-Germain-en-Laye, 16–17 Mars 2007, Société Préhistorique Française, Paris.Google Scholar
  29. Lichter, C. (2010). Jungsteinzeit im Umbruch: Die “Michelsberger Kultur” und Mitteleuropa vor 6000 Jahren, Theiß, Stuttgart.Google Scholar
  30. Link, T., and Pyzel, J. (eds.) (2017). Kulturkontakt und Kommunikation: Vorträge der AG Neolithikum während der Jahrestagung 2012 in Brandenburg/Havel, Fokus Jungsteinzeit–Berichte der AG Neolithikum 6, Welt und Erde, Kerpen/Loogh.Google Scholar
  31. Mathieson, I., Alpaslan Roodenberg, S., Posth, C., Szécsényi-Nagy, A., Roland, N., Mallick, S. et al. (2018). The genomic history of southeastern Europe. Nature 25778.  https://doi.org/10.1038/nature25778
  32. Meller, H., Risch, R., and Pernicka, E. (eds.) (2014), Metalle der Macht: Frühes Gold und Silber: 6, Mitteldeutscher Archäologentag vom 17. bis 19. Oktober 2013 in Halle (Saale), Tagungen des Landesmuseums Halle 11, Landesmuseum für Vorgeschichte, Halle.Google Scholar
  33. Michler, M. (2013). Les haches du Chalcolithique et de l’Âge du Bronze en Alsace, Prähistorische Bronzefunde IX, 26, Franz Steiner Verlag, Stuttgart.Google Scholar
  34. Nikolov, V., and Schier, W. (eds.) (2015). Der Schwarzmeerraum vom Neolithikum bis in die Früheisenzeit (6000–600 v.Chr.): Kulturelle Interferenzen in der zirkumpontischen Zone und Kontakte mit ihren Nachbargebieten, Prähistorische Archäologie in Südosteuropa 30, Leidorf, Rahden, pp. 321–338.Google Scholar
  35. Pétrequin, P., Gauthier, E., and Pétrequin, A. M. (eds.) (2017). Objets-signes et interprétations sociales des jades alpins dans l’Europe néolithique, JADE 2, Les Cahiers de la MSHE Ledoux 27, Presses Universitaires de Franche-Comté and CRAVA, Besançon.Google Scholar
  36. Pétrequin, A. M., Pétrequin, P., and Weller, O. (2006). Objets de pouvoir en Nouvelle-Guinée: Etude ethnoarchéologique d’un système de signes sociaux, Réunion des Musées Nationaux et CTHS, Paris.Google Scholar
  37. Ramminger, B. (2007). Wirtschaftsarchäologische Untersuchungen zu alt- und mittelneolithischen Felsgesteingeräten in Mittel- und Nordhessen—Archäologie und Rohmaterialversorgung, Internationale Archäologie 102, Leidorf, Rahden.Google Scholar
  38. Reiter, V. (2013). Ressourcenmanagement im Pfahlbau: Technologie und Rohmaterial der Steinbeilklingen vom Mondsee, Mitteilungen der Prähistorischen Kommission 81, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften,, Vienna.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Roberts, B. W., and Radivojević, M. (2015). Invention as a process: Pyrotechnologies in early societies. Cambridge Archaeological Journal 25: 299–306.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Roberts, B. W., and Thornton, C. P. (2014). Archaeometallurgy in Global Perspective: Methods and Syntheses, Springer, New York.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Rosinska-Balik, K., Dębowska-Ludwin, J., and Czarnowicz, M. (eds.) (2015). Copper and Trade in the South-Eastern Mediterranean: Trade routes of the Near East in Antiquity, BAR International Series 2753, Archaeopress, Oxford,Google Scholar
  42. Saville, A. (ed.) (2011). Flint and Stone in the Neolithic Period, Neolithic Studies Group and Lithic Studies Society Meeting at the British Museum, 7th November 2005, Oxbow, Oxford.Google Scholar
  43. Starnini, E., Szakmány, G., Jósza, S., Kasztovsky, Z., Szilágyi, V., Maróti, B., Voytek, B., and Horváth, F. (2015). Lithics from the site Hódmezódmezővásárhely-Gorzsa (southeast Hungary): Typology, technology, use and raw material strategies during the Late Neolithic (Tisza culture). In Hansen, S., Raczky, P., Anders, A., and Reingruber, A. (eds.), Neolithic and Copper Age between the Carpathians and the Aegean Sea: Chronologies and Technologies from the 6th to 4th Millennium BC: International Workshop Budapest 2012, Habelt, Bonn, pp. 105–128.Google Scholar
  44. Ştefan, C. E., Florea, M. Ş., and Lazăr, C. A. (eds.) (2014). Studii privind preistoria Sud-Estului Europei: Volum dedicat memoriei lui Mihai Şimon, Editura Istros, Brăila.Google Scholar
  45. Stockhammer, P. W., and Maran, J. (eds.), Appropriating Innovations: Entangled Knowledge in Eurasia, 5000–1500 BCE, Oxbow, Oxford.Google Scholar
  46. Szakmány, G., Starnini, E., Bradák, B., and Horváth, F. (2011). Investigating trade and exchange patterns in prehistory: Preliminary results of the archaeometric analyses of the stone artefacts from tell Gorzsa (southeast Hungary). In Turbanti-Memmi, I. (ed.), Proceedings of the 37th International Symposium on Archaeometry, Siena 12–16 May 2008, Springer, Berlin, pp. 311–319.Google Scholar
  47. Topping, P. (2010). Neolithic axe quarries and flint mines: Towards an ethnography of prehistoric extraction. In Brewer-LaPorta, M., Burke, A., and Field, D. (eds.), Ancient Mines and Quarries: A Trans-Atlantic Perspective, Oxbow, Oxford, pp. 23—32.Google Scholar
  48. Vitezovićm, S., and Antonović, D. (eds.) (2017). Archaeotechnology Studies: Raw Material Exploitation from Prehistory to the Middle Ages: Studije Arheotehnologije: Eksploatacija Sirovina od Praistorije do Srednjeg Veka, Srpsko arheološko društvo, Belgrad.Google Scholar
  49. Wentik, K. (2008). Crafting axes, producing meaning: Neolithic axe depositions in the northern Netherlands. Archaeological Dialogues 15: 151–173.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Wentink, K., and van Gijn, A. (2008). Neolithic depositions in the northern Netherlands. In Hamon, C., and Benedicte, B. (eds.), Hoards from the Neolithic to the Metal Ages: Technical and Codified Practices: Session of XIth Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists, Oxford, BAR International series 1758, Archaeopress, Oxford, pp. 29–43.Google Scholar
  51. Yerkes, R., Khalaily, H., and Barkai, R. (2012). Form and function of Early Neolithic bifacial stone tools reflects changes in land use practices during the Neolithization process in the Levant. PLoS ONE 7(0): 1-11.  https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0042442 CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Archaeology Division, Department for Research and Collections, Lower Saxony State Museum – Niedersächsisches LandesmuseumDas WeltenmuseumHannoverGermany

Personalised recommendations