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Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 26, Issue 3, pp 305–351 | Cite as

Archaeological Studies of Cooking and Food Preparation

  • Sarah R. Graff
Article

Abstract

Foodways have been a component of archaeological research for decades. However, cooking and food preparation, as specific acts that could reveal social information about life beyond the kitchen, only became a focus of archaeological inquiry more recently. A review of the literature on cooking and food preparation reveals a shift from previous studies on subsistence strategies, consumption, and feasting. The new research is different because of the social questions that are asked, the change in focus to preparation and production rather than consumption, and the interest in highlighting marginalized people and their daily experiences. The theoretical perspectives the literature addresses revolve around practice, agency, and gender. As a result, this new focus of archaeological research on cooking and preparing food is grounded in anthropology.

Keywords

Cooking Food preparation Cuisine Practice Agency Gender 

Notes

Acknowledgments

I have deep appreciation and gratitude for the guidance and patience of Gary M. Feinman and Linda Nicholas. They are professional yet benevolent, and this article benefitted greatly from their attention to detail. I also thank five anonymous reviewers who provided invaluable feedback that helped me to bring this article to completion. Laura Popova read a draft of this article and provided feedback and encouragement. Finally, my daughter patiently read novels on many nights and weekends when her mama was unavailable, and I thank her for her understanding.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Barrett, The Honors CollegeArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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