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Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 24, Issue 4, pp 325–372 | Cite as

Household Archaeology in Polynesia: Historical Context and New Directions

  • Jennifer G. Kahn
Article

Abstract

This review highlights archaeological investigations of precontact and historic house sites in Polynesia, a region noted for its diversity of chiefdoms in terms of scale and elaboration. Anthropological and historical perceptions of the Polynesian household have shifted over time, influencing the ways in which the household has been defined in archaeology. Early research emphasized houses as a unit of study within settlement pattern archaeology and as a means of delineating formal variability between sites and communities. Current studies stress a more holistic view of the household as a nexus of economic, social, and ritual activities. Diverse theoretical perspectives, such as the analytical concept of house societies, feminist archaeologies, landscape approaches, and agent-based models, have led to new archaeological approaches engaged with both the material and the nonmaterial aspects of the house and, in particular, how social relations structure the household. Current prominent themes include functional identification of house sites, understanding social variability, articulation of the household with the community, and comparative analyses of social complexity.

Keywords

Social variability Status Gender Domestic ritual Site proxemics House society 

Notes

Acknowledgments

A household archaeology seminar led some years ago by Rosemary Joyce was quite influential on my initial thoughts into households and their study at the microscale. Since then, my thinking on Polynesian and Pacific Island households has benefitted from discussions with Roger Green, Patrick Kirch, and Christophe Sand. Melinda Allen and Thegn Ladefoged turned my attention to several unpublished theses and dissertations. I thank the journal editors and the helpful comments and suggestions of Thomas Pluckhahn and four anonymous reviewers. Ally Campo and Mallory Moran are thanked for redrafting the figures.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Anthropology DepartmentCollege of William & MaryWilliamsburgUSA

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