Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 19, Issue 3, pp 281–325 | Cite as

The Archaeology of Native Societies in the Chesapeake: New Investigations and Interpretations

Article

Abstract

Archaeological studies of Native American societies in the Chesapeake have recently incorporated a broader range of interpretive frames, including those that emphasize historical contingency and social interaction rather than cultural ecology and cultural materialism. New evidence of Woodland-period population movements, persistent places, and cycles of social ranking has prompted historically oriented interpretations that foreground particular configurations of ideology, tradition, ritual, and agency. Contact-period studies have demonstrated that native strategies of the colonial period were rooted in precontact social landscapes. Contemporary American Indians are also reclaiming their pasts in ways that challenge archaeological practices and further broaden perspectives on the Chesapeake past.

Keywords

Chesapeake Woodland period Contact period Descendant communities 

Notes

Acknowledgments

I thank those who reviewed drafts of this essay and who offered critical feedback and commentary, including Dennis Blanton, Jay Custer, Jeffrey Hantman, Audrey Horning, Justine McKnight, Danielle Moretti-Langholtz, Stephen Potter, Randy Turner, and Buck Woodard. The five external reviewers of the original manuscript also provided detailed assessments of it and identified a number of serious weaknesses and oversights that I attempted to address in my revisions. I am particularly grateful to manuscript reviewer Joe Dent whose Chesapeake Prehistory served as the point of departure for this effort and whose suggested revisions improved the essay considerably. Any remaining omissions and errors are, of course, my own. Conversations with these colleagues and with Mike Klein, Chris Shephard, and Margaret Williamson have influenced the themes emphasized above. Several members of American Indian tribes in the Chesapeake, including Wayne Adkins, Ashley Atkins, and Mark Custalow, also reviewed this essay and the associated images and offered essential advice. Jeff Hantman, Mike Klein, and Stephen Potter shared with me unpublished data that were particularly helpful. I also thank Eric Agin who created the map of the Chesapeake and Ruth Trocolli and Dennis Knepper who provided access to the artifact photo from the Ramp 3 site.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyCollege of William and MaryWilliamsburgUSA

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