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Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 151–201 | Cite as

The Archaeological Study of Spanish Colonialism in the Americas

  • Mary Van Buren
Article

Abstract

Spanish colonial archaeology has undergone a fundamental shift since the Columbian Quincentenary due to the adoption of a bottom-up understanding of colonialism that emphasizes the analysis of local phenomena in a global context and the active ways in which people negotiated the processes set in motion by the conquest. This review examines five key research foci: culture change and identity, missionization, bioarchaeology, economics, and investigations of the colonial core. It ends with a consideration of ongoing challenges posed by the archaeology of colonialism, particularly the relationship of the individual to broader social processes and the emerging role of comparison.

Keywords

Spanish colonialism Archaeology Identity Missions 

Notes

Acknowledgments

I thank Hayley Hendricks and Rosalie Samaniego for all of their work formatting and correcting the bibliography, as well as Patricia Fournier, Thomas Charlton, Rani Alexander, Steve Wernke, Jeffrey Quilter, Maria Ximena Senatore, Clark Larsen, Haagen Klaus, Matt Liebmann, and Pedro Funari for sharing their own work and recommending that of others. Gary Feinman, Linda Nicholas, Thomas Charlton, Chuck Orser, Pru Rice, and three anonymous reviewers also provided helpful advice. Most of all I thank Dimitris, Maria, and Michael for their patience during the long process of writing this review. Given the tremendous amount of research that has been conducted on Spanish colonial archaeology over the last two decades, I am sure that I have inadvertently omitted interesting and important work. To those authors, my apologies.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA

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