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Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 17, Issue 2, pp 105–168 | Cite as

Zooarchaeology in Complex Societies: Political Economy, Status, and Ideology

  • Susan D. deFrance
Article

Abstract

The zooarchaeology of complex societies provides insights into the interrelated social and economic relationships that people and animals created. I present a synthesis of zooarchaeological research published since the early 1990s that addresses political economy, status distinctions, and the ideological and ritual roles of animals in complex cultures. I address current approaches and applications as well as theoretical shifts in zooarchaeological practice. Research indicates there is great variability across space and time in how past peoples used animals to generate economic surplus, to establish status differentiation within societies, and to create symbolic meaning through sacrifices, offerings, and in feasts. The study of human/animal interactions in complex societies can contribute to fundamental questions of broad relevance regarding political and social life.

Keywords

Zooarchaeology Complex societies Economy Ritual 

Notes

Acknowledgments

I thank the following individuals who provided information, references, or publications: Chester Cain, Kendall D. Campbell, Brad A. Chase, Jon Driver, Kitty F. Emery, Rowan Flad, George Gummerman IV, Sharyn Jones, Jui Ju, Sarah E. W. Kansa, Jon Kent, Justin Lev-Tov, Nene Lozada, Fiona Marshall, Kate Moore, Willy Mengoni Goñalons, Erin Thornton, and Tom Wake. I also recognize Stine Rossel who enthusiastically provided me with information regarding her Egyptian research shortly before her untimely, accidental death. Nicole Cannarozzi assisted me with the compilation of bibliographic sources and with proofreading. La-Gaye Sailsman formatted the majority of the references. Comments by Sharyn Jones, Bill Keegan, Justin Lev-Tov, and three anonymous reviewers greatly improved this article. All omissions and errors are my own.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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