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Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 329–377 | Cite as

What Maya Collapse? Terminal Classic Variation in the Maya Lowlands

  • James J. AimersEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Interest in the lowland Maya collapse is stronger than ever, and there are now hundreds of studies that focus on the era from approximately A.D. 750 to A.D. 1050. In the past, scholars have tended to generalize explanations of the collapse from individual sites and regions to the lowlands as a whole. More recent approaches stress the great diversity of changes that occurred across the lowlands during the Terminal Classic and Early Postclassic periods. Thus, there is now a consensus that Maya civilization as a whole did not collapse, although many zones did experience profound change.

Keywords

Maya Collapse Terminal Classic–Early Postclassic 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Almost every Maya archaeologist I know has contributed in some fashion to this article, but I would especially like to thank Elizabeth Graham and Jaime Awe for their continued support of my work. I am also indebted to Gary Feinman and Linda Nicholas for their patience with the time it took to produce this article and to the anonymous reviewers who made many good suggestions for its improvement.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of ArchaeologyUniversity College LondonLondonUK

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