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Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 14, Issue 3, pp 243–264 | Cite as

Engendered and Feminist Archaeologies of the Recent and Documented Pasts

  • Laurie A. Wilkie
  • Katherine Howlett Hayes
Original Paper

Abstract

Engendered and feminist archaeologies in historical archaeology have developed in complementary ways to those in nonhistorical archaeologies but with distinct methodological issues and sources of data. This article discusses the development of engendered and feminist archaeologies that use textual sources, the continuing themes that characterize this body of work, and the state of the field today. The article concludes with a discussion of future directions for practitioners to pursue.

Keywords

Historical archaeology Gender Feminism Social identity 

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© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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