Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics

, Volume 26, Issue 5, pp 1037–1050 | Cite as

Analysis of the “European Charter on General Principles for Protection of the Environment and Sustainable Development” The Council of Europe Document CO-DBP (2003)2

  • Maria A. Martin
  • Pablo Martínez de Anguita
  • Miguel Acosta
Review Paper

Abstract

For almost 50 years, the Council of Europe through a series of documents has been helping to build up a set of rules, principles, and strategies related to culture, environment, ethics, and sustainable development. At the moment, one of the most important aims of the Council of Europe’s agenda deals with the elaboration of the General Principles for the Protection of the Environment and Sustainable Development, as raised in document CO-DBP (2003)2 related to the environmental subject. The intention of the Council of Europe is to encourage national authorities to implement these General Principles into their national environmental policies. These principles should have an important effect, especially in those countries which are new members of the European Union. The primary target of this paper is the study of these principles and the setting of their entailed implications in order to establish a relation between values and policy making. Quite often, the conclusions adopted by the agreements generated within the framework of the European Union are controversial. Therefore, a study aiming to lay the foundations of these principles will make the exchange of ideas easier, providing a wider and more detailed scope in the European environmental policy.

Keywords

Council of Europe Environmental policy Environmental ethics Sustainable development Legal principles 

References

  1. Berry, T. (2004). That distant land: The collected stories. Washington, DC: Shoemaker & Hoard.Google Scholar
  2. Carr, M. (2004). Bioregionalism and civil society. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.Google Scholar
  3. Gardiner, S. (2004). Ethics and global climate change. Ethics, 114(3), 555–600.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Hardin, G. (1968). Tragedy of the commons. http://www.garretthardinsociety.org/articles/art_tragedy_of_the_commons.html. Accessed 26 Jan 2012.
  5. Holland, A. (2001). Sustainability. In D. Jamieson (Ed.), A companion to environmental philosophy (pp. 390–401). Malden, MA: Blackwell.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. King, R. (1999). Narrative, imagination, and the search for intelligibility in environmental ethics. Ethics and the Environment, 4(1), 23–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Leopold, A. (1970). A Sand County Almanac with essays on conservation from Round River. New York: Ballantine Books.Google Scholar
  8. Light, A. (2002). The urban blind spot in environmental ethics. http://www.lancs.ac.uk/depts/philosophy/awaymave/onlineresources/andrew%20light.pdf. Accessed 26 Jan 2012.
  9. Light, A. (2003). Ecological restoration and the culture of nature: A pragmatic perspective. In A. Light & H. Rolston (Eds.), Environmental ethics, an anthology (pp. 398–411). Malden, MA: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  10. Maathai, W. (2004). The Green Belt Movement: Sharing the approach and the experience. New York: Green Press Initiative. Lantern Books.Google Scholar
  11. Martínez de Anguita, P. (2012). Environmental solidarity: how religions can sustain sustainability. New York: Routlegde.Google Scholar
  12. Naess, A. (1984). Intuition, intrinsic value and deep ecology. The Ecologist, 14, 5–6.Google Scholar
  13. Norton, B. (1984). Environmental ethics and weak anthropocentrism. Environmental Ethics, 6(2), 131–148.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Norton, B. (1992). Sustainability, human welfare, and ecosystem health. Environmental Values, 1(2), 97–111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Norton, B. (2003a). Environmental ethics and weak anthropocentrism. In A. Light & H. Rolston (Eds.), Environmental ethics, an anthology (pp. 163–174). Malden, MA: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  16. Norton, B. (2003b). Integration or reduction. Two approaches to environmental values. In C. Van de Veer & C. Pierce (Eds.), Environmental ethics and policy book. Philosophy, ecology, economics (pp. 47–77). Belmont, CA: Wadsword Publisher, Co.Google Scholar
  17. Norton, B., & Hannon, B. (2003). Democracy and sense of place values in environmental policy. In A. Light & H. Rolston (Eds.), Environmental ethics, an anthology (pp. 500–515). Malden, MA: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  18. Prieur, M. (2003). Draft European Chapter on General Principles for Protection of the Environment and Sustainable Development. CO-DBP (2003)2. Council of Europe.Google Scholar
  19. Robertson, A. H. (1956). The Council of Europe. Its structure, functions and achievements. London: Stevens & Sons Limited.Google Scholar
  20. Sagoff, M. (2004). The view from quincy library or civic engagement in environmental problem solving. In M. Sagoff (Ed.), Price, principle, and environment (pp. 201–232). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Sale, K. (1974). Mother of all. In S. Kumar (Ed.), The Schumacher lectures (Vol. 2). London: Abacus.Google Scholar
  22. Sen, A. (1988). On ethics and economics. Malden, MA: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  23. Shiva, V. (2003). Earth democracy in action. Tikkun, 18, 1–43.Google Scholar
  24. Smith, M. (2001). An ethic of place radical ecology, postmodernity, and social theory. Albany: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
  25. Solow, R. (1993). Sustainability: An economist’s perspective. In R. Dorfam & N. S. Dorm (Eds.), Economics of the environment. Selected readings (pp. 179–187). New York: WW Norton and Company.Google Scholar
  26. Staples, R. W. (2009). For a species moral right to exist: The imperative of an adequate environmental ethics, master thesis. Fort Collins, CO: Colorado State University.Google Scholar
  27. Stone, C. (2003). Moral pluralism and the course of environmental ethics. In A. Light & H. Rolston (Eds.), Environmental ethics, an anthology (pp. 193–202). Malden, MA: Blackwell.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria A. Martin
    • 1
  • Pablo Martínez de Anguita
    • 1
  • Miguel Acosta
    • 2
  1. 1.ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos (URJC) c/Tulipán s/nMóstoles, MadridSpain
  2. 2.Universidad CEU San PabloMadridSpain

Personalised recommendations