A New Format for Learning about Farm Animal Welfare

Article

Abstract

Farm animal welfare is a knowledge domain that can be regarded as a model for new ways of organizing learning and making higher education more responsive to the needs of society. Global concern for animal welfare has resulted in a great demand for knowledge. As a complement to traditional education in farm animal welfare, higher education can be more demand driven and look at a broad range of methods to make knowledge available. The result of an inventory on “farm animal welfare,” “e-learning,” “learning resources,” and “open educational resources” in three different search engines is presented. A huge amount of information on animal welfare is available on the Internet but many of the providers lock in the knowledge in a traditional course context. Only a few universities develop and disseminate open learning resources within the subject. Higher education institutions are encouraged to develop open educational resources in animal welfare for the benefit of teachers, students, society, and, indirectly, animal welfare.

Keywords

Animal welfare Open educational resources E-learning Learning resources Web search 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne Algers
    • 1
  • Berner Lindström
    • 2
  • Edmond A. Pajor
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Food ScienceSwedish University of Agricultural SciencesSkaraSweden
  2. 2.Department of EducationUniversity of GothenburgGothenburgSweden
  3. 3.Department of Production Animal HealthUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada

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