Journal of Academic Ethics

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 89–99 | Cite as

Investigating Perceptions of Students to a Peer-Based Academic Integrity Presentation Provided by Residence Dons

  • Lucia Zivcakova
  • Eileen Wood
  • Gail Forsyth
  • Martin Zivcak
  • Joshua Shapiro
  • Amanda Coulas
  • Amy Linseman
  • Brittany Mascioli
  • Stephen Daniels
  • Valentin Angardi
Article

Abstract

This study investigated students’ (n = 819) perceptions following a prepared, common presentation regarding academic integrity provided by their residence dons. This peer instruction study utilized both quantitative and qualitative analyses of survey data within a pre-test post-test design. Overall, students reported gains in knowledge, as well as confidence in their knowledge of academic integrity. Notably, students reported increases in their personal value for academic integrity after participating in the presentations. Overall, the quality and content of the presentations were judged positively, and participants’ ratings of the presentation were predictive of increases in personal value of academic integrity, as well as self-reported knowledge and confidence gains. Qualitative analyses supported that the key ideas in the presentation served as the focal material for discussion, but also introduced specific topics that students wanted to explore in greater depth.

Keywords

Academic integrity Academic misconduct Peer-instruction Instructional intervention 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lucia Zivcakova
    • 1
  • Eileen Wood
    • 1
  • Gail Forsyth
    • 1
  • Martin Zivcak
    • 1
  • Joshua Shapiro
    • 1
  • Amanda Coulas
    • 1
  • Amy Linseman
    • 1
  • Brittany Mascioli
    • 1
  • Stephen Daniels
    • 1
  • Valentin Angardi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyWilfrid Laurier UniversityWaterlooCanada

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