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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 49, Issue 12, pp 4974–4996 | Cite as

Update of a Meta-analysis of Sensory Symptoms in ASD: A New Decade of Research

  • Ayelet Ben-SassonEmail author
  • Eynat Gal
  • Ronen Fluss
  • Neta Katz-Zetler
  • Sharon A. Cermak
Original Paper

Abstract

This meta-analysis updated evidence regarding sensory over-responsivity (SOR), under-responsivity (SUR) and seeking symptoms in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) relative to typical controls and those with other conditions. Fifty-five questionnaire studies included 4606 individuals with ASD. Moderators tested were age, IQ, male ratio, matching group, and self-report. Compared to typical controls, effect size was large and significant for SOR, SUR, and Seeking but heterogeneous. For Seeking, age, IQ and self-report were significant moderators. Compared with developmental disorders (DDs) groups, effect size was significantly positive for SOR and Seeking; whereas compared with other clinical groups, only SOR was significant. These findings highlight the core nature of sensory symptoms in ASD and particularly SOR. Explanatory factors are yet to be revealed.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorders Sensory symptoms Sensory profile Meta-analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank all the researchers who sent us the data needed for their samples to be included in the meta analysis.

Author Contributions

AB, EG, and SC conceived of the study and its design. AB designed and coordinated the study, performed literature search, data extraction, coding, analyses, and wrote the manuscript; EG reviewed coding and data interpretation. RF conducted statistical analysis; NK was involved in data extraction and coding; SC was involved in data analsis planning, data interpretation and writing the manuscript. All authors approved the manuscript.

Funding

This work has been supported by a National Institute of Psychobiology Dylan Tauber Young Investigator Grant awarded to Dr. A. Ben-Sasson (Grant Number 204-177-18b).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare they have no conflict of interests.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in this meta-analysis were in accordance with the Ethical Standards of the Institutional Research Committee and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Occupational Therapy DepartmentUniversity of HaifaHaifaIsrael
  2. 2.Biostatistics and Biomathematics Department, The Gertner InstituteChaim Sheba Medical CenterTel HashomerIsrael
  3. 3.Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational TherapyUniversity of South CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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