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Validation of the Brief Autism Mealtime Behavior Inventory (BAMBI) Questionnaire

  • Kamila CastroEmail author
  • Ingrid Schweigert Perry
  • Gabriela Pachecho Ferreira
  • Josemar Marchezan
  • Michele Becker
  • Rudimar Riesgo
OriginalPaper
  • 56 Downloads

Abstract

This study aims to translate the Brief Autism Mealtime Behaviour Inventory (BAMBI) questionnaire to Brazilian Portuguese, in order to provide a tool to be used in clinic routine that encourages the evaluation of the feeding behaviour of patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The final sample contained 410 participants, the mean age was 9.58 ± 1.2 and the majority of participants were male (95%). Validation of this questionnaire allows a structured evaluation for this population to be integrated not only into the clinical routine but also to help parent’s interventions about the eating problems and possible consequences. This is of utmost importance, since parents are reporting the nutritional aspects more often, and studies indicate that up to 80% of ASD patients may present feeding behavior problems.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Feeding behaviours Nutrition 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors gratefully thank Dr. Lukens, the author of the original questionnaire that was used in this paper. KC was supported by Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES). GP was supported by Fundação de Amparo a Pesquisa do Rio Grande do Sul- Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (FAPERGS-HCPA, 2017) and Bolsa de Iniciação Científica- Universidade Federal do Grande do Sul (BIC-UFRGS, 2018).

Author Contributions

KC conceptualized and designed the study, drafted the initial manuscript, collected data, carried out the initial analyses, and critically reviewed the manuscript for important intellectual content; IP conceptualized and designed the study, drafted the initial manuscript, and critically reviewed the manuscript for important intellectual content; GPF collected data, carried out the initial analyses, interpreted the data, and revised the manuscript. JM collected data, carried out the initial analyses, interpreted the data, and revised the manuscript. MB collected data, carried out the initial analyses, interpreted the data, and revised the manuscript. RR conceptualized and designed the study, drafted the initial manuscript, collected data, carried out the initial analyses, critically reviewed the manuscript for important intellectual content. All authors approved the final manuscript as submitted and agree to be accountable for all aspects of the work.

Funding

This study was funded by Fundo de Incentivo à Pesquisa e Eventos-Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (FIPE-HCPA) (Grant Number 16-0581).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

10803_2019_4006_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (119 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 119 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kamila Castro
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
    Email author
  • Ingrid Schweigert Perry
    • 2
  • Gabriela Pachecho Ferreira
    • 2
  • Josemar Marchezan
    • 3
    • 4
  • Michele Becker
    • 4
  • Rudimar Riesgo
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Postgraduate Program in Child and Adolescent Health (PPGSCA)Federal University of Rio Grande do SulPorto AlegreBrazil
  2. 2.Food and Nutrition Research Centre (CESAN), Clinical Research Center (CPC)Clinical Hospital of Porto Alegre/Federal University of Rio Grande do SulPorto AlegreBrazil
  3. 3.Translational Group in Autism Spectrum Disorder (GETTEA)Federal University of Rio Grande do SulPorto AlegreBrazil
  4. 4.Child Neurology UnitClinical Hospital of Porto AlegrePorto AlegreBrazil
  5. 5.INSERM U1215, Neurocentre Magendie, Physiopathologie de la Plasticité NeuronaleBordeauxFrance

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