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Brief Report: Evaluation of the Short Quantitative Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (Q-CHAT-10) as a Brief Screen for Autism Spectrum Disorder in a High-Risk Sibling Cohort

  • Sarah RazaEmail author
  • Lonnie Zwaigenbaum
  • Lori-Ann R. Sacrey
  • Susan Bryson
  • Jessica Brian
  • Isabel M. Smith
  • Kyle Reid
  • Wendy Roberts
  • Peter Szatmari
  • Tracy Vaillancourt
  • Caroline Roncadin
  • Nancy Garon
Brief Report

Abstract

This study examined the potential of the short form of the Quantitative Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (Q-CHAT-10) to identify autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in a high-risk sibling cohort. High-risk (HR; siblings of children diagnosed with ASD) and low-risk (LR; no family history of ASD) toddlers were assessed prospectively at 18 and 24 months of age using the Q-CHAT-10 and underwent blind diagnostic assessment for ASD at 36 months of age. The results indicated that at 18 and 24 months, total score differentiated between HR toddlers subsequently diagnosed with ASD from other HR and LR toddlers. The sensitivity at both time points was acceptable; however, the specificity was below the level recommended for clinical application.

Keywords

Autism Autism spectrum disorder Early screening Behavioral signs Infant siblings Classification accuracy 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank all the families who participated in the research, as well as the research coordinators at each site. This study was supported by Women & Children’s Health Research Institute (WCHRI), Alberta Innovates-Health Solutions, Brain Canada, Kids Brain Health Network (formerly NeuroDevNet), Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Azrieli Foundation, and Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation Chair in Autism.

Funding

This study was funded by Women & Children’s Health Research Institute (WCHRI), Alberta Innovates-Health Solutions, Brain Canada, Kids Brain Health Network (formerly NeuroDevNet), Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Azrieli Foundation, and Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation Chair in Autism.

Author Contributions

SR made substantial contributions to the conception and design of the paper, analyzed data, and prepared all drafts of the paper. LZ, LRS, SB, JB, IMS, KR, WR, PS, TV, CR, and NG contributed to the conception of the project, provided critical review of the manuscript, and approved the final draft.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah Raza
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Lonnie Zwaigenbaum
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lori-Ann R. Sacrey
    • 1
    • 2
  • Susan Bryson
    • 3
  • Jessica Brian
    • 4
    • 5
  • Isabel M. Smith
    • 3
  • Kyle Reid
    • 2
  • Wendy Roberts
    • 6
  • Peter Szatmari
    • 5
    • 7
    • 8
  • Tracy Vaillancourt
    • 9
  • Caroline Roncadin
    • 10
  • Nancy Garon
    • 11
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Autism Research Centre (E209)Glenrose Rehabilitation HospitalEdmontonCanada
  3. 3.IWK Health CentreDalhousie UniversityHalifaxCanada
  4. 4.Bloorview Research InstituteTorontoCanada
  5. 5.University of TorontoTorontoCanada
  6. 6.ISANDTorontoCanada
  7. 7.The Hospital for Sick ChildrenTorontoCanada
  8. 8.Centre for Addiction and Mental HealthTorontoCanada
  9. 9.University of OttawaOttawaCanada
  10. 10.McMaster Children’s Hospital–Hamilton Health SciencesHamiltonCanada
  11. 11.Mount Allison UniversitySackvilleCanada

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