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Brief Report: A Novel System to Evaluate Autism Spectrum Disorders Using Two Humanoid Robots

  • Hirokazu KumazakiEmail author
  • Taro Muramatsu
  • Yuichiro Yoshikawa
  • Yuko Yoshimura
  • Takashi Ikeda
  • Chiaki Hasegawa
  • Daisuke N. Saito
  • Jiro Shimaya
  • Hiroshi Ishiguro
  • Masaru Mimura
  • Mitsuru Kikuchi
Brief Report

Abstract

We investigated the feasibility of our novel evaluation system for use with children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We prepared the experimental setting with two humanoid robots in reference to the birthday party scene in the Autism Diagnostic Observational Schedule (ADOS). We assessed the relationship between social communication ability measured in the ADOS condition (i.e., with a human clinician) and in a robotic condition for children with ASD. There were significant correlations between the social communication scores in the gold-standard ADOS condition and the robotic condition for children with ASD. The current work provides support for a unique application of a robotic system (i.e., two robot-mediated interaction) to evaluate the severity of autistic traits for children with ASD.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorders Typical development ADOS Severity Social communication Robot 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We have no financial relationships to disclose. The authors gratefully acknowledge the contribution of the participants.

Author Contributions

HK designed the study, conducted the experiment, performed the statistical analyses, analyzed and interpreted the data, and drafted the manuscript. TM, YuiY, YukY, TI, CH, DNS, JS, HI, MM and MK conceived the study, participated in its design, assisted with the data collection and scoring of the behavioral measures, analyzed and interpreted the data, were involved in drafting the manuscript and revised the manuscript critically for important intellectual content. MK was involved in the final approval of the version to be published. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Funding

Funding was provided by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (Grant No. 18H02746), ERATO ISHIGURO Symbiotic Human-Robot Interaction Project and the Center of Innovation Program from the Japan Science and Technology Agency, JST, Japan.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

Yuichiro Yoshikawa and Hiroshi Ishiguro serve as consultants of Vstone Co. Ltd. Hiroshi Ishiguro owns stock in the same company.

Ethical Approval

All procedures involving human participants were conducted in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Participants were recruited from Kanazawa University Hospital and related institutions. After a complete explanation of the study, all the participants and their parents provided written, informed consent. All participants and their parents agreed to participate in the study.

Supplementary material

Supplementary material 1 (MP4 17780 KB)

10803_2018_3848_MOESM2_ESM.docx (19 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (DOCX 19 KB)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hirokazu Kumazaki
    • 1
    Email author return OK on get
  • Taro Muramatsu
    • 2
  • Yuichiro Yoshikawa
    • 3
  • Yuko Yoshimura
    • 1
  • Takashi Ikeda
    • 1
  • Chiaki Hasegawa
    • 1
  • Daisuke N. Saito
    • 1
  • Jiro Shimaya
    • 3
  • Hiroshi Ishiguro
    • 3
  • Masaru Mimura
    • 2
  • Mitsuru Kikuchi
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Center for Child Mental DevelopmentKanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan
  2. 2.Department of NeuropsychiatryKeio University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Systems Innovation, Graduate School of Engineering ScienceOsaka UniversityOsakaJapan

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