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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 48, Issue 7, pp 2516–2529 | Cite as

Comparing Mobile Technologies for Teaching Vocational Skills to Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders and/or Intellectual Disabilities Using Universally-Designed Prompting Systems

  • Toni Van LaarhovenEmail author
  • Adam Carreon
  • Wendy Bonneau
  • Ashli Lagerhausen
Original Paper

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare mobile technologies with universally-designed prompting systems to improve the independent vocational performance of four adolescents with ASD and/or ID in school-based employment settings. Specific aims were to (1) compare the effectiveness of universally-designed prompting systems presented on iPads and HP Slates that involved participant-selection and participant-fading of available on-screen media prompts; (2) compare the usability of different mobile devices; and (3) determine if built-in decision prompts could improve problem-solving behavior during task completion. Results indicated that both devices resulted in immediate and substantial increases in independent responding for three of the four participants. All participants performed better with their preferred device and all self-faded reliance on instructional prompts as skill acquisition increased.

Keywords

Video prompting Mobile technology Vocational skills Autism spectrum disorders Intellectual disabilities Universal design 

Notes

Author Contributions

TVL conceived of and designed the study, obtained funding for devices and graduate support, developed instructional materials, developed data collection procedures, and drafted the manuscript. AC assisted with the design of the study, developed instructional materials, implemented research conditions, collected data, and contributed to manuscript revision. WB assisted with participant selection, task selection, design of study, and contributed to the manuscript. AL developed instructional materials, implemented research conditions, collected data, and assisted with data analysis.

Funding

This research was funded in part by a grant received from Northern Illinois University for Research and Artistry. Special thanks go to the students and staff at DeKalb High School.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

Toni Van Laarhoven declares she has no conflict of interest. Adam Carreon declares he has no conflict of interest. Wendy Bonneau declares she has no conflict of interest, and Ashli Lagerhausen declares she has no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in this study involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Special and Early EducationNorthern Illinois UniversityDekalbUSA
  2. 2.DeKalb High SchoolDekalbUSA

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