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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 48, Issue 6, pp 2139–2147 | Cite as

Sensory Subtypes in Preschool Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Scott D. Tomchek
  • Lauren M. Little
  • John Myers
  • Winnie Dunn
Original Paper

Abstract

Given the heterogeneity of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), research has investigated how sensory features elucidate subtypes that enhance our understanding of etiology and tailored treatment approaches. Previous studies, however, have not integrated core developmental behaviors with sensory features in investigations of subtypes in ASD. Therefore, we used latent profile analysis to examine subtypes in a preschool aged sample considering sensory processing patterns in combination with social–communication skill, motor performance, and adaptive behavior. Results showed four subtypes that differed by degree and quality of sensory features, age and differential presentation of developmental skills. Findings partially align with previous literature on sensory subtypes and extends our understanding of how sensory processing aligns with other developmental domains in young children with ASD.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Sensory processing Subtypes Development 

Notes

Author Contributions

SDT conceived of the study, participated in the design, performed data collection and drafted the manuscript; LML conceived of the study, participated in the design, performed statistical analysis and drafted the manuscript; JM participated in the design and performed statistical analysis; WD conceived of the study, participated in the design, and drafted the manuscript.

Funding

Dr. Dunn acknowledges funding from Pearson Publishing for instrument development of the Short Sensory Profile used in the study.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Drs. Tomchek, Little and Myers declare they have no conflicts of interest. Dr. Dunn receives royalties from Pearson Publishing for sales of the Short Sensory Profile used in this study, though Pearson maintains copyright ownership.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Scott D. Tomchek
    • 1
    • 5
  • Lauren M. Little
    • 3
    • 5
  • John Myers
    • 2
  • Winnie Dunn
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Louisville, Weisskopf Center/UofL Autism CenterLouisvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Louisville, Child and Adolescent Health Research Design and Support (CAHRDS) UnitLouisvilleUSA
  3. 3.Department of Occupational Therapy EducationRush UniversityChicagoUSA
  4. 4.Department of Occupational Therapy EducationUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA
  5. 5.Department of Occupational Therapy EducationUniversity of Kansas Medical CenterKansas CityUSA

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