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Collateral Effects of Youth Disruptive Behavior Disorders on Mothers’ Psychological Distress: Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder, Intellectual Disability, or Typical Development

  • Jan Blacher
  • Bruce L. Baker
Original Paper

Abstract

Disruptive behavior disorders were assessed in 160 youth aged 13 years, with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD, n = 48), intellectual disability (ID, n = 28), or typical development (TD, n = 84). Mothers’ reported collateral effects on their psychological adjustment were related to both youth disability status and clinical level behavior disorders. More youth with ASD or ID had clinical level behavior disorders than their TD peers, and their mothers reported significantly higher personal stress and psychological symptoms, as well as lower positive impact of the youth on the family. The youth’s clinical level behavior disorders accounted for these differences more than the diagnostic status. Mothers high in dispositional optimism reported the lowest stress and psychological symptoms in relationship to youth behavior challenges.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Intellectual disability Adolescence Behavior disorders Mother stress and well-being Optimism 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This paper was based on the activities of the Collaborative Family Study, a two-site longitudinal study supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (Grant Number 34879-1459). This work was done in collaboration with The Help Group-UCLA Autism Research Alliance and Dr. Elizabeth Laugeson, and with partial support from the SEARCH Family Autism Center at UC Riverside and the UCR Vice Chancellor for Research. We appreciate the efforts of our doctoral students, staff, colleague Dr. Keith Crnic and participating families.

Author Contributions

JB conceptualized the study. BLB conducted the analyses and both JB and BLB interpreted the findings. JB and BLB drafted the manuscript and conducted manuscript editing. Both BLB and JB directed the conduct of study, interviews with families, etc. BLB was P.I. of the grant which funded in, and JB was co-P.I.

Funding

Funding for this study was obtained from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (Grant Number 34879-1459).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in this study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of EducationUniversity of California, UCRRiversideUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)Los AngelesUSA

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