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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 47, Issue 2, pp 275–284 | Cite as

Establishing Computer-Assisted Instruction to Teach Academics to Students with Autism as an Evidence-Based Practice

  • Jenny R. Root
  • Bradley S. Stevenson
  • Luann Ley Davis
  • Jennifer Geddes-Hall
  • David W. Test
Original Paper

Abstract

Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) is growing in popularity and has demonstrated positive effects for students with disabilities, including those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In this review, criteria for group experimental and single case studies were used to determine quality (Horner et al., Exceptional Children 71:165–179, 2005; Gersten et al., Exceptional Children 71:149–164, 2005; National Technical Assistance Center on Transition Center 2015). Included studies of high and adequate quality were further analyzed in terms of content, context, and specific instructional practices. Based on the NTACT criteria, this systematic review has established CAI as an evidence-based practice for teaching academics to students with ASD with support from 10 single-case and two group design studies of high or adequate quality. Suggestions for future research and implications for practice are discussed.

Keywords

Technology Academics Autism Evidence-based practice 

Notes

Author Contributions

All authors contributed to the analytic methods and written work presented in this paper. All authors were involved in the final revisions and approval of the published manuscript.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

Jenny R. Root declares she has no conflict of interest. Bradley S. Stevenson declares he has no conflict of interest. Luann Ley Davis declares she has no conflict of interest. Jennifer Geddes Hall declares she has no conflict of interest. David W. Test declares he has no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jenny R. Root
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Bradley S. Stevenson
    • 1
  • Luann Ley Davis
    • 1
  • Jennifer Geddes-Hall
    • 1
    • 4
  • David W. Test
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Special Education and Child DevelopmentUniversity of North Carolina at CharlotteCharlotteUSA
  2. 2.School of Teacher Education, College of EducationFlorida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA
  3. 3.Florida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA
  4. 4.Department of Teaching and LearningFlorida International UniversityMiamiUSA

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