Advertisement

Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 46, Issue 11, pp 3557–3566 | Cite as

Peer Victimization and Educational Outcomes in Mainstreamed Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

  • Ryan Adams
  • Julie Taylor
  • Amie Duncan
  • Somer Bishop
Original Paper

Abstract

The majority of adolescents with ASD spend a significant amount of the school day in general education settings; yet, many of these students exhibit problems at school. The current manuscript examined whether specific types of peer victimization were associated with a range of educational outcomes. Participants from study 1 included parents of 1221 adolescents from the Interactive Autism Network. Study 2 included 54 adolescent males and one of their parents that were recruited from a clinic registry. Both studies found that all types of victimization were associated with educational outcomes. These findings indicate that, in addition to improving overall well-being of students with ASD, reducing peer victimization could have positive effects on educational performance of these students.

Keywords

Victimization ASD School Bullying 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by Grant R40MC28145 from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to Somer Bishop and Ryan Adams.

Author Contributions

R. Adams contributed to the conceptualization and design of the study, acquisition of data, analysis and interpretation of data, and lead the writing of the manuscript. J. Taylor contributed in interpretation of data and drafting the manuscript. A. Duncan contributed to the conceptualization and design of the study and acquisition of data. S. Bishop contributed to conceptualizing and design of the study, interpretation of data, and drafting the manuscript.

Funding

This work was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (R40MC28145).

Complaince with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

Ryan Adams, Julie Taylor, Amie Duncan, and Somer Bishop declare no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

The data described for the first study were part of a secondary data analysis and the current authors were not part of the procedures for collecting this data. The principle investigator of the primary data collection of this data was in accordance with ethical standards of institutional research committees and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. All procedures performed in the second study described in this manuscript were performed by the first and last authors and were in accordance with ethical standards of institutional research committees and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

The first study described is a secondary data analysis but in the primary data collection, informed consent was obtained by from all individual participants included in the study. For the second study, the first and second authors obtained informed consent from all parents included in the study as well as informed assents from all adolescents.

References

  1. Achenbach, T. M., & Rescorla, L. A. (2001). Child behavior checklist. Burlington, VT: University of Vermont Research Center for Children, Youth and Families.Google Scholar
  2. Adams, R. E., Fredstrom, B. K., Duncan, A. W., Holleb, L. J., & Bishop, S. L. (2014). Using self- and parent-reports to test the association between peer victimization and internalizing symptoms in verbally fluent adolescents with ASD. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44(4), 861–872. doi: 10.1007/s10803-013-1938-0.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Ashburner, J., Ziviani, J., & Rodger, S. (2010). Surviving in the mainstream: Capacity of children with autism spectrum disorders to perform academically and regulate their emotions and behavior at school. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 4(1), 18–27. doi: 10.1016/j.rasd.2009.07.002.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Buhs, E. S., Ladd, G. W., & Herald, S. L. (2006). Peer exclusion and victimization: Processes that mediate the relation between peer group rejection and children’s classroom engagement and achievement? Journal of Educational Psychology, 98(1), 1–13. doi: 10.1037/0022-0663.98.1.1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Cappadocia, M. C., Weiss, J. A., & Pepler, D. (2012). Bullying experiences among children and youth with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 42(2), 266–277. doi: 10.1007/s10803-011-1241-x.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Chamberlain, B., Kasari, C., & Rotheram-Fuller, E. (2007). Involvement or isolation? The social networks of children with autism in regular classrooms. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 37(2), 230–242. doi: 10.1007/s10803-006-0164-4.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Cornell, D., Gregory, A., Huang, F., & Fan, X. (2013). Perceived prevalence of teasing and bullying predicts high school dropout rates. Journal of Educational Psychology, 105(1), 138–149. doi: 10.1037/a0030416.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Cotugno, A. J. (2009). Social competence and social skills training and intervention for children with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 39(9), 1268–1277.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Delmolino, L., & Harris, S. L. (2012). Matching children on the autism spectrum to classrooms: A guide for parents and professionals. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 42(6), 1197–1204. doi: 10.1007/s10803-011-1298-6.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. DeRosier, M. E., Swick, D. C., Davis, N. O., McMillen, J. S., & Matthews, R. (2011). The efficacy of a social skills group intervention for improving social behaviors in children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 41(8), 1033–1043.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Dugan, E., Kamps, D., & Leonard, B. (1995). Effects of cooperative learning groups during social studies for students with autism and fourth-grade peers. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 28(2), 175–188. doi: 10.1901/jaba.1995.28-175.PubMedPubMedCentralCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Estes, A., Rivera, V., Bryan, M., Cali, P., & Dawson, G. (2011). Discrepancies between academic achievement and intellectual ability in higher-functioning school-aged children with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 41(8), 1044–1052. doi: 10.1007/s10803-010-1127-3.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Farmer, C. A., & Aman, M. G. (2011). Aggressive behavior in a sample of children with autism spectrum disorders. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 5(1), 317–323.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Farmer, C., Butter, E., Mazurek, M. O., Cowan, C., Lainhart, J., Cook, E. H., et al. (2014). Aggression in children with autism spectrum disorders and a clinic-referred comparison group. Autism,. doi: 10.1177/1362361313518995.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  15. Grindle, C. F., Hastings, R. P., Saville, M., Hughes, J. C., Huxley, K., Kovshoff, H., et al. (2012). Outcomes of a behavioral education model for children with autism in a mainstream school setting. Behavior Modification, 36(3), 298–319. doi: 10.1177/0145445512441199.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Humphrey, N., & Symes, W. (2011). Peer interaction patterns among adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) in mainstream school settings. Autism, 15(4), 397–419. doi: 10.1177/1362361310387804.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Jahromi, L. B., Bryce, C. I., & Swanson, J. (2013). The importance of self-regulation for the school and peer engagement of children with high-functioning autism. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 7(2), 235–246. doi: 10.1016/j.rasd.2012.08.012.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Jones, A. P., & Frederickson, N. (2010). Multi-informant predictors of social inclusion for students with autism spectrum disorders attending mainstream school. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 40(9), 1094–1103. doi: 10.1007/s10803-010-0957-3.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Jones, C. R., Happe, F., Golden, H., Marsden, A. J., Tregay, J., Simonoff, E., et al. (2009). Reading and arithmetic in adolescents with autism spectrum disorders: Peaks and dips in attainment. Neuropsychology, 23(6), 718–728. doi: 10.1037/a0016360.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Juvonen, J., Nishina, A., & Graham, S. (2001). Self-views versus peer perceptions of victim status among early adolescents. In J. Juvonen & S. Graham (Eds.), Peer harassment in school: The plight of the vulnerable and victimized (pp. 105–124). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  21. Juvonen, J., Nishina, A., & Graham, S. (2006). Ethnic diversity and perceptions of safety in urban middle schools. Psychological Science, 17(5), 393–400. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9280.2006.01718.x.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Juvonen, J., Wang, Y., & Espinoza, G. (2011). Bullying experiences and compromised academic performance across middle school grades. The Journal of Early Adolescence, 31(1), 152–173. doi: 10.1177/0272431610379415.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Kamps, D. M., Barbetta, P. M., Leonard, B. R., & Delquadri, J. (1994). Classwide peer tutoring: an integration strategy to improve reading skills and promote peer interactions among students with autism and general education peers. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 27(1), 49–61. doi: 10.1901/jaba.1994.27-49.PubMedPubMedCentralCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Kärnä, A., Voeten, M., Little, T. D., Alanen, E., Poskiparta, E., & Salmivalli, C. (2013). Effectiveness of the KiVa antibullying program: Grades 1–3 and 7–9. Journal of Educational Psychology, 105(2), 535–551. doi: 10.1037/a0030417.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Kärnä, A., Voeten, M., Little, T. D., Poskiparta, E., Alanen, E., & Salmivalli, C. (2011a). Going to scale: A nonrandomized nationwide trial of the KiVa antibullying program for grades 1–9. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 79(6), 796–805. doi: 10.1037/a0025740.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Kärnä, A., Voeten, M., Little, T. D., Poskiparta, E., Kaljonen, A., & Salmivalli, C. (2011b). A large-scale evaluation of the KiVa antibullying program: Grades 4–6. Child Development, 82(1), 311–330. doi: 10.111/j.1467-8624.2010.01557.x.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Keen, D., Webster, A., & Ridley, G. (2015). How well are children with autism spectrum disorder doing academically at school? An overview of the literature. Autism, 20(3), 276–294. doi: 10.1177/1362361315580962.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Koning, C., Magill-Evans, J., Volden, J., & Dick, B. (2013). Efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy-based social skills intervention for school-aged boys with autism spectrum disorders. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 7(10), 1282–1290.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Locke, J., Ishijima, E. H., Kasari, C., & London, N. (2010). Loneliness, friendship quality and the social networks of adolescents with high-functioning autism in an inclusive school setting. Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, 10(2), 74–81. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-3802.2010.01148.x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Lord, C., & McGee, J. P. (2001). Educating children with autism. Washington, DC: National Academy.Google Scholar
  31. McMahon, C. M., Vismara, L. A., & Solomon, M. (2013). Measuring changes in social behavior during a social skills intervention for higher-functioning children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 43(8), 1843–1856.PubMedPubMedCentralCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Nishina, A., & Bellmore, A. (2010). When might peer aggression, victimization, and conflict have its largest impact? Microcontextual considerations. The Journal of Early Adolescence, 30(1), 5–26. doi: 10.1177/0272431609350928.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Nishina, A., Juvonen, J., & Witkow, M. R. (2005). Sticks and stones may break my bones, but names will make me feel sick: The psychosocial, somatic, and scholastic consequences of peer harassment. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 34(1), 37–48. doi: 10.1207/s15374424jccp3401_4.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Olweus, D. (1978). Aggression in the schools: Bullies and their whipping boys. Washington, DC: Hemisphere.Google Scholar
  35. Panerai, S., Zingale, M., Trubia, G., Finocchiaro, M., Zuccarello, R., Ferri, R., et al. (2009). Special education versus inclusive education: The role of the TEACCH program. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 39(6), 874–882. doi: 10.1007/s10803-009-0696-5.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Perry, D. G., Perry, L. C., & Kennedy, E. (1992). Conflict and the development of antisocial behavior. In C. U. Shantz & W. W. Hartup (Eds.), Conflict in child and adolescent development (pp. 301–329). New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  37. Prinstein, M. J., & Cillessen, A. H. N. (2003). Forms and functions of adolescent peer aggression associated with high levels of peer status. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 49, 310–342.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Reijntjes, A., Kamphuis, J. H., Prinzie, P., & Telch, M. J. (2010). Peer victimization and internalizing problems in children: A meta-analysis of longitudinal studies. Child Abuse and Neglect, 34(4), 244–252. doi: 10.1016/.chiabu.2009.07.009.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Schohl, K. A., Van Hecke, A. V., Carson, A. M., Dolan, B., Karst, J., & Stevens, S. (2014). A replication and extension of the PEERS intervention: Examining effects on social skills and social anxiety in adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44(3), 532–545.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Schwartz, D. (2000). Subtypes of victims and aggressors in children’s peer groups. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 28, 181–192.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Schwartz, D., Farver, J. M., Chang, L., & Lee-Shin, Y. (2002). Victimization in South Korean children’s peer groups. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 30(2), 113–125. doi: 10.1023/a:1014749131245.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Schwartz, D., Proctor, L. J., & Chien, D. H. (2001). The aggressive victim of bullying: Emotional and behavioral dysregulation as a pathway to victimization by peers. In J. Juvonen & S. Graham (Eds.), Peer harassment in school: The plight of the vulnerable and victimized (pp. 147–174). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  43. Snyder, T. D., & Dillow, S. A. (2015). Digest of education statistics 2013 (NCES 2015–2011). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education.Google Scholar
  44. Sterzing, P. R., Shattuck, P. T., Narendorf, S. C., Wagner, M., & Cooper, B. P. (2012). Bullying involvement and autism spectrum disorders: Prevalence and correlates of bullying involvement among adolescents with an autism spectrum disorder. Archive of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine Journal, 166(11), 1058–1064. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.790.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Symes, W., & Humphrey, N. (2010). Peer-group indicators of social inclusion among pupils with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) in mainstream secondary schools: A comparative study. School Psychology International, 31(5), 478–494. doi: 10.1177/0143034310382496.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Wei, X., Lenz, K. B., & Blackorby, J. (2013). Math growth trajectories of students with disabilities: Disability category, gender, racial, and socioeconomic status differences from ages 7 to 17. Remedial and Special Education, 34(3), 154–165. doi: 10.1177/0741932512448253.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Weiss, J. A., Viecili, M. A., Sloman, L., & Lunsky, Y. (2013). Direct and indirect psychosocial outcomes for children with autism spectrum disorder and their parents following a parent-involved social skills group intervention. Journal of the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 22(4), 303–309.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  48. Wentzel, K. R. (2005). Peer relationships, motivation, and academic performance at school. In Handbook of competence and motivation. (pp. 279–296). New York, NY: Guilford Publications.Google Scholar
  49. Whitehouse, A. J., Durkin, K., Jaquet, E., & Ziatas, K. (2009). Friendship, loneliness and depression in adolescents with Asperger’s syndrome. Journal of Adolescence, 32(2), 309–322. doi: 10.1016/j.adolescence.2008.03.004.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Zablotsky, B., Bradshaw, C. P., Anderson, C., & Law, P. (2012). Involvement in bullying among children with autism spectrum disorders: Parents’ perspectives on the influence of school factors. Behavioral Disorders, 37(3), 179–191.Google Scholar
  51. Zablotsky, B., Bradshaw, C. P., Anderson, C. M., & Law, P. (2014). Risk factors for bullying among children with autism spectrum disorders. Autism, 18(4), 419–427. doi: 10.1177/1362361313477920.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryan Adams
    • 1
  • Julie Taylor
    • 2
  • Amie Duncan
    • 1
  • Somer Bishop
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Developmental and Behavioral PediatricsCincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical CenterCincinnatiUSA
  2. 2.Vanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  3. 3.University of California San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA

Personalised recommendations