Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 46, Issue 10, pp 3308–3316 | Cite as

Parent-Reported Repetitive Behavior in Toddlers on the Autism Spectrum

  • Hannah H. Schertz
  • Samuel L. Odom
  • Kathleen M. Baggett
  • John H. Sideris
Original Paper
  • 708 Downloads

Abstract

Toddlers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were assessed on the Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised (RBS-R), which we found to have acceptable internal consistency. Stereotypical subscale scores showed a negligible association with cognitive level, but correlated more strongly with adaptive and social indicators. Relative to earlier reported RBS-R scores for older age groups, toddlers’ scores trended toward higher stereotyped behavior and lower ritualistic/sameness behavior. Our findings on associations with developmental indicators align with those of researchers who used more resource-intensive repetitive behavior measures. The convergence of these findings with those derived from other measurement methods suggests that the RBS-R, a cost effective parent-report measure, is a viable means of assessing repetitive behavior in toddlers with autism.

Keywords

Repetitive and restrictive behavior Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised Toddlers with autism 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This project was supported by a grant from The Institute for Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education #R324A120291.

Author Contributions

HHS directed the larger three-site study of which the current study was a part, designed the current study, conducted preliminary statistical analysis, and drafted the manuscript; SLO oversaw data analysis for the larger study, led site activities, conceived the initial focus for the current study, and provided conceptual input. KMB led site activities, oversaw assessment activities for the larger study, and provided conceptual input. JHS participated in the design of the study and performed the statistical analysis. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Curriculum and InstructionIndiana University School of EducationBloomingtonUSA
  2. 2.Frank Porter Graham Child Development InstituteUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  3. 3.Juniper Gardens Children’s ProjectUniversity of KansasKansasUSA

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