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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 46, Issue 9, pp 3177–3182 | Cite as

Brief Report: Investigating the Implications of Applying the New DSM-5 Criteria for Diagnosing Autism Spectrum Disorder in a Preschool Population in Singapore

  • Chui Mae Wong
  • Hwan Cui KohEmail author
Brief Report

Abstract

Diagnostic reports for 206 children who underwent an assessment for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) using the DSM-IV-TR criteria, were re-evaluated using the DSM-5 criteria. Mean age of the children at time of diagnosis was 3 years 10 months. Of the 202 children diagnosed with ASD on the DSM-IV-TR, 184 (91.1 %) also met the DSM-5 criteria for ASD. The overall concordance rate of ASD diagnosis on the DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 was higher than that reported in other studies. Of the 18 children who did not meet DSM-5 criteria for ASD, 16 children met all social communication criteria but did not fulfil at least two restricted and repetitive behaviour (RRB) criteria. Six of those children had further RRBs emerging later on follow-up.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorders DSM-5 DSM-IV-TR Diagnosis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank Ms. Kirthana Vasudevan, who was a medical student at the National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, for assisting with the study.

Author Contributions

CW conceived of the study, participated in its design and coordination, re-evaluated the diagnostic reports, conducted the data analysis and drafted the manuscript; HK participated in the interpretation of the data, re-evaluated the diagnostic reports and helped to draft the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

Authors Chui Mae Wong and Hwan Cui Koh declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Standard

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. For this type of study formal consent is not required.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Child DevelopmentKK Women’s and Children’s HospitalSingaporeSingapore
  2. 2.National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of MedicineSingaporeSingapore

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