Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 46, Issue 9, pp 2940–2955 | Cite as

Intellectual Profiles in the Autism Spectrum and Other Neurodevelopmental Disorders

  • Susana Mouga
  • Cátia Café
  • Joana Almeida
  • Carla Marques
  • Frederico Duque
  • Guiomar Oliveira
Original Paper

Abstract

The influence of specific autism spectrum disorder (ASD) deficits in Intelligence Quotients (IQ), Indexes and subtests from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III was investigated in 445 school-aged children: ASD (N = 224) and other neurodevelopmental disorders (N = 221), matched by Full-Scale IQ and chronological age. ASD have lower scores in the VIQ than PIQ. The core distinctive scores between groups are Processing Speed Index and “Comprehension” and “Coding” subtests with lower results in ASD. ASD group with normal/high IQ showed highest score on “Similarities” subtest whereas the lower IQ group performed better on “Object Assembly”. The results replicated our previous work on adaptive behaviour, showing that adaptive functioning is positively correlated with intellectual profile, especially with the Communication domain in ASD.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Neurodevelopmental disorders Intellectual profiles Cognitive ability Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Medicine, Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Life SciencesUniversity of CoimbraCoimbraPortugal
  2. 2.Unidade de Neurodesenvolvimento e Autismo do Serviço do Centro de Desenvolvimento da Criança, Pediatric HospitalCentro Hospitalar e Universitário de CoimbraCoimbraPortugal
  3. 3.Faculty of Medicine, University Clinic of PediatricsUniversity of CoimbraCoimbraPortugal
  4. 4.Centro de Investigação e Formação Clínica, Pediatric HospitalCentro Hospitalar e Universitário de CoimbraCoimbraPortugal

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