Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 46, Issue 3, pp 1038–1050 | Cite as

Strategies for Disseminating Information on Biomedical Research on Autism to Hispanic Parents

  • Clara M. Lajonchere
  • Barbara Y. Wheeler
  • Thomas W. Valente
  • Cary Kreutzer
  • Aron Munson
  • Shrikanth Narayanan
  • Abe Kazemzadeh
  • Roxana Cruz
  • Irene Martinez
  • Sheree M. Schrager
  • Lisa Schweitzer
  • Tara Chklovski
  • Darryl Hwang
Original Paper

Abstract

Low income Hispanic families experience multiple barriers to accessing evidence-based information on Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). This study utilized a mixed-strategy intervention to create access to information in published bio-medical research articles on ASD by distilling the content into parent-friendly English- and Spanish-language ASD Science Briefs and presenting them to participants using two socially-oriented dissemination methods. There was a main effect for short-term knowledge gains associated with the Science Briefs but no effect for the dissemination method. After 5 months, participants reported utilizing the information learned and 90 % wanted to read more Science Briefs. These preliminary findings highlight the potential benefits of distilling biomedical research articles on ASD into parent-friendly educational products for currently underserved Hispanic parents.

Keywords

Biomedical research on Autism Hispanic/Latino Health literacy Racial disparities 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Clara M. Lajonchere
    • 1
    • 2
  • Barbara Y. Wheeler
    • 3
    • 4
  • Thomas W. Valente
    • 5
  • Cary Kreutzer
    • 3
    • 4
    • 10
  • Aron Munson
    • 5
    • 11
  • Shrikanth Narayanan
    • 1
  • Abe Kazemzadeh
    • 1
    • 12
  • Roxana Cruz
    • 3
    • 6
    • 13
  • Irene Martinez
    • 6
    • 15
  • Sheree M. Schrager
    • 7
  • Lisa Schweitzer
    • 8
  • Tara Chklovski
    • 9
  • Darryl Hwang
    • 1
    • 9
    • 14
  1. 1.University of Southern California Viterbi School of EngineeringLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Autism SpeaksLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.USC University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities at Children’s Hospital Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  4. 4.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Southern California Keck School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA
  5. 5.Department of Preventive MedicineUniversity of Southern California Keck School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA
  6. 6.Fiesta Educativa, Inc.Los AngelesUSA
  7. 7.Division of Hospital MedicineChildren’s Hospital Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  8. 8.University of Southern California Price School of Public PolicyLos AngelesUSA
  9. 9.IridescentLos AngelesUSA
  10. 10.University of Southern California Davis School of GerontologyLos AngelesUSA
  11. 11.Loma Linda University Medical CenterTemeculaUSA
  12. 12.VixletLos AngelesUSA
  13. 13.1736 Family Crisis CenterLos AngelesUSA
  14. 14.USC Department of RadiologyHealthcare Consultation Center IILos AngelesUSA
  15. 15.Fiesta Educativa, Inc.Los AngelesUSA

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