Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 45, Issue 12, pp 3919–3931 | Cite as

Replication and Comparison of the Newly Proposed ADOS-2, Module 4 Algorithm in ASD Without ID: A Multi-site Study

  • Cara E. Pugliese
  • Lauren Kenworthy
  • Vanessa Hus Bal
  • Gregory L. Wallace
  • Benjamin E. Yerys
  • Brenna B. Maddox
  • Susan W. White
  • Haroon Popal
  • Anna Chelsea Armour
  • Judith Miller
  • John D. Herrington
  • Robert T. Schultz
  • Alex Martin
  • Laura Gutermuth Anthony
S.I. : ASD in Adulthood: Comorbidity and Intervention

Abstract

Recent updates have been proposed to the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-2 Module 4 diagnostic algorithm. This new algorithm, however, has not yet been validated in an independent sample without intellectual disability (ID). This multi-site study compared the original and revised algorithms in individuals with ASD without ID. The revised algorithm demonstrated increased sensitivity, but lower specificity in the overall sample. Estimates were highest for females, individuals with a verbal IQ below 85 or above 115, and ages 16 and older. Best practice diagnostic procedures should include the Module 4 in conjunction with other assessment tools. Balancing needs for sensitivity and specificity depending on the purpose of assessment (e.g., clinical vs. research) and demographic characteristics mentioned above will enhance its utility.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Adults Adolescents Diagnosis Autism diagnostic observation schedule Sensitivity Specificity 

Supplementary material

10803_2015_2586_MOESM1_ESM.doc (60 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 61 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cara E. Pugliese
    • 1
  • Lauren Kenworthy
    • 1
  • Vanessa Hus Bal
    • 2
  • Gregory L. Wallace
    • 3
    • 7
  • Benjamin E. Yerys
    • 4
    • 5
  • Brenna B. Maddox
    • 4
    • 6
  • Susan W. White
    • 6
  • Haroon Popal
    • 7
  • Anna Chelsea Armour
    • 1
  • Judith Miller
    • 4
    • 5
  • John D. Herrington
    • 4
    • 5
  • Robert T. Schultz
    • 4
    • 8
  • Alex Martin
    • 7
  • Laura Gutermuth Anthony
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders & Children’s National Research InstituteChildren’s National Health SystemWashingtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan FranciscoUSA
  3. 3.Department of Speech and Hearing SciencesGeorge Washington UniversityWashingtonUSA
  4. 4.Center for Autism ResearchChildren’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaUSA
  5. 5.Department of PsychiatryPerelman School of Medicine - University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  6. 6.Department of PsychologyVirginia TechBlacksburgUSA
  7. 7.Laboratory of Brain and CognitionNational Institute of Mental HealthBethesdaUSA
  8. 8.Department of PediatricsUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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