Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 45, Issue 9, pp 2981–2990 | Cite as

Activity Participation and Sensory Features Among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

  • Lauren M. Little
  • Karla Ausderau
  • John Sideris
  • Grace T. Baranek
Original Paper

Abstract

Sensory features are highly prevalent among children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and have been shown to cluster into four patterns of response, including hyperresponsiveness, hyporesponsiveness, enhanced perception, and sensory interests, repetitions and seeking behaviors. Given the lack of large-scale research on the differential effects of sensory response patterns on children’s participation in specific activities, this study investigated the extent to which sensory response patterns impacted six dimensions of children’s activity participation as measured by the Home and Community Activities Scale among a large, national sample of school aged children with ASD (n = 674). Using mixed model regression, results showed that sensory response patterns differentially impacted dimensions of activity participation, and associations were moderated by a number of child characteristics.

Keywords

Sensory processing Autism Participation 

References

  1. Ashburner, J., Bennett, L., Rodger, S., & Ziviani, J. (2013). Understanding the sensory experiences of young people with autism spectrum disorder: A preliminary investigation. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 60(3), 171–180.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Ashburner, J., Ziviani, J., & Rodger, S. (2008). Sensory processing and classroom, emotional, behavioral, and educational outcomes in children with autism spectrum disorder. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 62(5), 564–573.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Ausderau, K. K., Furlong, M., Sideris, J., Bulluck, J., Little, L. M., Watson, L. R., & Baranek, G. T. (2014a). Sensory subtypes in children with autism spectrum disorder: Latent profile transition analysis using a national survey of sensory features. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 55(8), 935–944.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Ausderau, K., Sideris, J., Furlong, M., Little, L. M., Bulluck, J., & Baranek, G. T. (2014b). National survey of sensory features in children with ASD: Factor structure of the sensory experience questionnaire (3.0). Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44(4), 915–925.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Bagby, M., Dickie, V., & Baranek, G. T. (2012). How sensory experiences in children with and without autism affect family occupations. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 66, 78–86.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Baranek, G. T. (1999). Sensory processing assessment for young children (SPA). Unpublished manuscript, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.Google Scholar
  7. Baranek, G. T. (2009). Sensory experiences questionnaire version 3.0. Unpublished manuscript.Google Scholar
  8. Baranek, G. T., Boyd, B. A., Poe, M. D., David, F. J., & Watson, L. R. (2007). Hyperresponsive sensory response patterns in young children with autism, developmental delay, and typical development. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 112(4), 233–245.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Baranek, G. T., Chin, Y. H., Hess, L. M. G., Yankee, J. G., Hatton, D. D., & Hooper, S. R. (2002). Sensory processing correlates of occupational performance in children with fragile X syndrome: Preliminary findings. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 56(5), 538–546.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Baranek, G. T., David, F. J., Poe, M. D., Stone, W. L., & Watson, L. R. (2006). Sensory experiences questionnaire: Discriminating sensory features in young children with autism, developmental delays, and typical development. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 47(6), 591–601. doi:10.1111/j.1469-7610.2005.01546.x.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Baron-Cohen, S., Ashwin, E., Ashwin, C., Tavassoli, T., & Chakrabarti, B. (2009). Talent in autism: Hyper-systemizing, hyper-attention to detail and sensory hypersensitivity. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, 364, 1377–1383.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Benjamini, Y., & Hochberg, Y. (1995). Controlling the false discovery rate: A practical and powerful approach to multiple testing. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society. Series B (Methodological), 289–300.Google Scholar
  13. Ben-Sasson, A., Cermak, S. A., Orsmond, G. I., Tager-Flusberg, H., Carter, A. S., Kadlec, M. B., & Dunn, W. (2007). Extreme sensory modulation behaviors in toddlers with autism spectrum disorders. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 61(5), 584–592.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Ben-Sasson, A., Hen, L., Fluss, R., Cermak, S. A., Engel-Yeger, B., & Gal, E. (2009). A meta-analysis of sensory modulation symptoms in individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 39(1), 1–11. doi:10.1007/s10803-008-0593-3.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Bonnnel, A., Mottron, L., Peretz, I., Trudel, M., Gallun, E., & Bonnel, A. (2003). Enhanced pitch sensitivity in individuals with autism: A signal detection analysis. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 15(2), 226–235.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Boyd, B. A., Baranek, G. T., Sideris, J., Poe, M. D., Watson, L. R., Patten, E., & Miller, H. (2010). Sensory features and repetitive behaviors in children with autism and developmental delays. Autism Research, 3, 78–87.PubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. Brown, N. B., & Dunn, W. (2010). Relationship between context and sensory processing in children with autism. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 64, 474–483.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. Burchinal, M., & Appelbaum, M. I. (1991). Estimating individual developmental functions: Methods and their assumptions. Child Development, 62(1), 23–43. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Cascio, C., McGlone, F., Folger, S., Tannan, V., Baranek, G., Pelphrey, K. A., & Essick, G. (2008). Tactile perception in adults with autism: A multidimensional psycho-physical study. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 38, 127–137.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. Constantino, J. N., Davis, S. A., Todd, R. D., Schindler, M. K., Gross, M. M., et al. (2003). Validation of a brief quantitative measure of autistic traits: Comparison of the social responsiveness scale with the autism diagnostic interview—Revised. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 33, 427–433.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. Constantino, J. N., & Gruber, C. P. (2005a). Social responsiveness scale (SRS). Los Angeles, CA: Western Psychological Services.Google Scholar
  22. Constantino, J. N., & Gruber, C. P. (2005b). Social responsiveness scale manual. Los Angeles, CA: Western Psychological Services.Google Scholar
  23. Constantino, J. N., Gruber, C. P., Davis, S., Hayes, S., Passanante, N., & Przybeck, T. (2004). The factor structure of autistic traits. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 45(4), 719–726. CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. Daniels, A. M., Rosenberg, R. E., Anderson, C., Law, J. K., Marvin, A. R., & Law, P. A. (2012). Verification of parent-report of child autism spectrum disorder diagnosis to a web-based autism registry. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 42(2), 257–265.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. DeGrace, B. W. (2004). The everyday occupation of families with children with autism. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 58, 543–550.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  26. Delaney, K. A., Rudser, K. R., Yund, B. D., Whitley, C. B., Haslett, P. A., & Shapiro, E. G. (2013). Methods of neurodevelopmental assessment in children with neurodegenerative disease: Sanfilippo syndrome. JIMD Reports, 13, 129–137.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  27. Dickie, V. A., Baranek, G. T., Schultz, B., Watson, L. R., & McComish, C. S. (2009). Parent reports of sensory experiences of preschool children with and without autism: A qualitative study. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 63(2), 172–181.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  28. Dunn, W. (1999). Sensory profile. San Antonio, TX: The Psychological Corporation.Google Scholar
  29. Dunn, W. (2007). Supporting children to participate successfully in everyday life by using sensory processing knowledge. Infants and Young Children, 20(2), 84–101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Dunst, C. J., Bruder, M. B., Trivette, C. M., & Hamby, D. W. (2006). Everyday activity settings, natural learning environments, and early intervention practices. Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 3, 3–10.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Dunst, C. J., Hamby, D., Trivette, C. M., Raab, M., & Bruder, M. B. (2000). Everyday family and community life and children’s naturally occurring learning opportunities. Journal of Early Intervention, 23(3), 151–164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Hilton, C. L., Crouch, M. C., & Israel, H. (2008). Out-of-school participation patterns in children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 62(5), 554–563.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  33. Hilton, C., Graver, K., & LaVesser, P. (2007). Relationship between social competence and sensory processing in children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 1(2), 164–173.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Hochhauser, M., & Engel-Yeger, B. (2010). Sensory processing abilities and their relation to participation in leisure activities among children with high- functioning autism spectrum disorder. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 4, 746–754.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Humphry, R., & Wakeford, L. (2006). An occupation-centered discussion of development and implications for practice. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 60, 267–358.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Kaufman, A. S. (2004). Manual for the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children–Second Edition (KABC-II), Comprehensive Form. Circle Pines, MN: American Guidance Service.Google Scholar
  37. Landry, R., & Bryson, S. E. (2004). Impaired disengagement of attention in young children with autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 45(6), 1115–1122.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  38. Lane, A. E., Molloy, C. A., & Bishop, S. L. (2014). Classification of children with autism spectrum disorder by sensory subtype: A case for sensory-based phenotypes. Autism Research, 7(3), 322–333.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  39. Larson, E. (2006). Caregiving and autism: How does children’s propensity for routinization influence participation in family activities? OTJR: Occupational Therapy Journal of Research, 26(2), 69–79.Google Scholar
  40. Larson, E. (2010). Ever vigilant: Maternal support of participation in daily life for boys with autism. Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 30(1), 16–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. LeVesser, P., & Berg, C. (2011). Participation pattern in preschool children with autism spectrum disorder. Occupational Therapy Journal of Research, 31(1), 33–39.Google Scholar
  42. Levy, S. E., Giarelli, E., Lee, L. C., Schieve, L. A., Kirby, R. S., Cunniff, C., & Rice, C. E. (2010). Autism spectrum disorder and co-occurring developmental, psychiatric, and medical conditions among children in multiple populations of the United States. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 31(4), 267–275.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  43. Liss, M., Saulnier, C., Fein, D., & Kinsbourne, M. (2006). Sensory and attention abnormalities in autistic spectrum disorders. Autism, 10(2), 155–172. doi:10.1177/1362361306062021.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  44. Littell, R. C., Milliken, G. A., Stroup, W. W., Wolfinger, R. D., & Schabenberger, O. (2006). SAS for mixed models (2nd ed.). Cary, NC: SAS Publishing, SAS Institute.Google Scholar
  45. Little, L. M., Freuler, A. C., Houser, M. B., Guckian, L., Carbine, K., David, F. J., & Baranek, G. T. (2011). Psychometric validation of the sensory experiences questionnaire. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 65(2), 207–210.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  46. Little, L. M., Sideris, J., Ausderau, K., & Baranek, G. T. (2014). Activity participation among children with autism spectrum disorder. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68(2), 177.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  47. Lord, C., Rutter, M., DiLavore, P. C., & Risi, S. (1999). Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-WPS (ADOS-WPS). Los Angeles, CA: Western Psychological Services.Google Scholar
  48. Marquenie, K., Rodger, S., Mangohig, K., & Cronin, A. (2011). Dinnertime and bedtime routines and rituals in families with a young child with an autism spectrum disorder. Australian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 58, 145–154.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Matson, J. L. (2008). Clinical assessment and intervention for autism spectrum disorders: Practical resources for the mental health professional. Burlington, MA: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  50. McIntosh, D. N., Miller, L. J., Shyu, V., & Dunn, W. (1999). Overview of the short sensory profile (SSP). The sensory profile: Examiner’s manual, pp. 59–73.Google Scholar
  51. Mottron, L., Dawson, M., & Soulières, I. (2009). Enhanced perception in savant syndrome: Patterns, structure and creativity. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 364(1522), 1385–1391. doi:10.1098/rstb.2008.0333.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Mottron, L., Dawson, M., Soulieres, I., Hubert, B., & Burack, J. (2006). Enhanced perceptual functioning in autism: An update, and eight principles of autistic perception. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 36(1), 27–43. doi:10.1007/s10803-005-0040-7.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  53. Mottron, L., Peretz, I., & Menard, E. (2000). Local and global processing of music in high‐functioning persons with autism: Beyond central coherence? Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 41(8), 1057–1065.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  54. Orsmond, G. I., & Kuo, H. Y. (2011). The daily lives of adolescents with an autism spectrum disorder Discretionary time use and activity partners. Autism, 15(5), 579–599.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  55. Orsmond, G. I., Krauss, M. W., & Seltzer, M. M. (2004). Peer relationships and social and recreational activities among adolescents and adults with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 34(3), 245–256.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  56. Orsmond, G. I., Shattuck, P. T., Cooper, B. P., Sterzing, P. R., & Anderson, K. A. (2013). Social participation among young adults with an autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 43(11), 2710–2719.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  57. Parham, L. D., Ecker, C., Miller Kuhaneck, H., Henry, D. A., & Glennon, T. J. (2007). Sensory processing measure (SPM): Manual. Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services.Google Scholar
  58. Potvin, M., Snider, L., Prelock, P., Kehayia, & Wood-Dauphinee, S. (2012). Recreational participation of children with high functioning autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. doi:10.1007/s10803-012-1589-6.
  59. Qualtrics Labs, Inc. software (2011). Version 21269 of the qualtrics research suite. Provo, UT: Qualtrics Labs, Inc. http://www.qualtrics.com.
  60. Raudenbush, S. W., & Bryk, A. S. (2002). Hierarchical linear models. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  61. Reynolds, S., Bendixen, R. M., Lawrence, T., & Lane, S. J. (2011). A pilot study examining activity participation, sensory responsiveness, and competence in children with high functioning autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 41, 1496–1506.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  62. Rosenberg, L., Bart, O., Ratzon, N. Z., & Jarus, T. (2013). Personal and environmental factors predict participation of children with and without mild developmental disabilities. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 22(5), 658–671.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Rosenberg, L., Jarus, T., Bart, O., & Ratzon, N. Z. (2011). Can personal and environmental factors explain dimensions of child participation? Child: Care, Health and Development, 37(2), 266–275.Google Scholar
  64. SAS Institute Inc. (2008). SAS 9.2R. Retrieved from SAS Institute Inc.Google Scholar
  65. Scattone, D., Raggio, D. J., & May, W. (2011). Comparison of the Vineland adapative behavior scales and the Bayley scales of infant and toddler development. Psychological Reports, 109(2), 626–634.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  66. Schaaf, R. C., Toth-Cohen, S., Outten, G., Johnson, S., & Madrid, G. (2011). The everyday routines of families of children with autism: Examining the impact of sensory processing difficulties on the family. Autism Research, 15(3), 373–389.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Schoen, S. A., Miller, L. J., & Green, K. E. (2008). Pilot study of the sensory over-responsivity scales: Assessment and inventory. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 62(4), 393–406.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  68. Shattuck, P. T., Orsmond, G. I., Wagner, M., & Cooper, B. P. (2011). Participation in social activities among adolescents with an autism spectrum disorder. PLoS One, 6(11), e27176.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  69. Sparrow, S. S., Cicchetti, D. V., & Balla, D. A. (2005). Vineland adaptive behavior scales: (Vineland II), survey interview form/caregiver rating form. Livonia, MN: Pearson Assessments.Google Scholar
  70. Tomchek, S. D., & Dunn, W. (2007). Sensory processing in children with and without autism: A comparative study using the short sensory profile. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 61(2), 190–200.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  71. Tommerdahl, M., Tannan, V., Cascio, C. J., Baranek, G. T., & Whitsel, B. L. (2007). Vibrotactile adaptation fails to enhance spatial localization in adults with autism. Brain Research, 1154, 116–123.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  72. Watson, L. R., Patten, E., Baranek, G. T., Poe, M., Boyd, B. A., Freuler, A., & Lorenzi, J. (2011). Differential associations between sensory response patterns and language, social, and communication measures in children with autism or other developmental disabilities. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 54(6), 1562–1576. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0029).PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  73. Wood, J. J., & Gadow, K. D. (2010). Exploring the nature and function of anxiety in youth with autism spectrum disorders. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 17(4), 281–292.Google Scholar
  74. Wuang, Y., & Su, C. Y. (2012). Patterns of participation and enjoyment in adolescents with Down syndrome. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 33(3), 841–848.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  75. Zingerevich, C., & Patricia, D. L. (2009). The contribution of executive functions to participation in school activities of children with high functioning autism spectrum disorder. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 3(2), 429–437.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lauren M. Little
    • 1
  • Karla Ausderau
    • 2
  • John Sideris
    • 3
  • Grace T. Baranek
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Occupational TherapyUniversity of Kansas Medical CenterKansas CityUSA
  2. 2.Occupational Therapy Program, Department of KinesiologyUniversity of Wisconsin at MadisonMadisonUSA
  3. 3.Frank Porter Graham Child Development InstituteUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  4. 4.Division of Occupational Science, Department of Allied Health SciencesUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

Personalised recommendations