Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 45, Issue 11, pp 3424–3432 | Cite as

Maladaptive Behavior in Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Role of Emotion Experience and Emotion Regulation

  • Andrea C. Samson
  • Antonio Y. Hardan
  • Ihno A. Lee
  • Jennifer M. Phillips
  • James J. Gross
S.I. : Emotion Regulation and Psychiatric Comorbidity in ASD

Abstract

Maladaptive behavior is common in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). However, the factors that give rise to maladaptive behavior in this context are not well understood. The present study examined the role of emotion experience and emotion regulation in maladaptive behavior in individuals with ASD and typically developing (TD) participants. Thirty-one individuals with ASD and 28 TD participants and their parents completed questionnaires assessing emotion experience, regulation, and maladaptive behavior. Compared to TD participants, individuals with ASD used cognitive reappraisal less frequently, which was associated with increased negative emotion experience, which in turn was related to greater levels of maladaptive behavior. By decreasing negative emotions, treatments targeting adaptive emotion regulation may therefore reduce maladaptive behaviors in individuals with ASD.

Keywords

ASD Emotion regulation Maladaptive behavior Emotion experience Mediation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrea C. Samson
    • 1
  • Antonio Y. Hardan
    • 2
  • Ihno A. Lee
    • 1
  • Jennifer M. Phillips
    • 2
  • James J. Gross
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA

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