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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 45, Issue 6, pp 1513–1531 | Cite as

School-Based Peer-Related Social Competence Interventions for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Meta-Analysis and Descriptive Review of Single Case Research Design Studies

  • Kelly J. Whalon
  • Maureen A. Conroy
  • Jose R. Martinez
  • Brittany L. Werch
Original Paper

Abstract

The purpose of this review was to critically examine and summarize the impact of school-based interventions designed to facilitate the peer-related social competence of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Reviewed studies employed a single-case experimental design, targeted peer-related social competence, included children 3–12 years old with an ASD, and took place in school settings. Articles were analyzed descriptively and using the evaluative method to determine study quality. Additionally, effect size estimates were calculated using nonoverlap of all pairs method and Tau-U. A total of 37 studies including 105 children were reviewed. Overall, ES estimates ranged from weak to strong, but on average, the reviewed interventions produced a moderate to strong effect, and quality ratings were generally in the acceptable to high range. Findings suggest that children with ASD can benefit from social skill interventions implemented with peers in school settings.

Keywords

Social competence Social communication Autism spectrum disorder Literature review Meta-analysis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kelly J. Whalon
    • 1
  • Maureen A. Conroy
    • 2
  • Jose R. Martinez
    • 2
  • Brittany L. Werch
    • 2
  1. 1.College of EducationFlorida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA
  2. 2.College of EducationUniversity of FloridaTallahasseeUSA

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