Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 45, Issue 7, pp 1951–1966 | Cite as

Evidence-Based Practices for Children, Youth, and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Comprehensive Review

  • Connie Wong
  • Samuel L. Odom
  • Kara A. Hume
  • Ann W. Cox
  • Angel Fettig
  • Suzanne Kucharczyk
  • Matthew E. Brock
  • Joshua B. Plavnick
  • Veronica P. Fleury
  • Tia R. Schultz
Original Paper

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify evidenced-based, focused intervention practices for children and youth with autism spectrum disorder. This study was an extension and elaboration of a previous evidence-based practice review reported by Odom et al. (Prev Sch Fail 54:275–282, 2010b, doi:10.1080/10459881003785506). In the current study, a computer search initially yielded 29,105 articles, and the subsequent screening and evaluation process found 456 studies to meet inclusion and methodological criteria. From this set of research studies, the authors found 27 focused intervention practices that met the criteria for evidence-based practice (EBP). Six new EBPs were identified in this review, and one EBP from the previous review was removed. The authors discuss implications for current practices and future research.

Keywords

Evidence-based practice Focused intervention Autism spectrum disorder Children and youth 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Connie Wong
    • 1
  • Samuel L. Odom
    • 1
  • Kara A. Hume
    • 1
  • Ann W. Cox
    • 1
  • Angel Fettig
    • 2
  • Suzanne Kucharczyk
    • 1
  • Matthew E. Brock
    • 3
  • Joshua B. Plavnick
    • 4
  • Veronica P. Fleury
    • 5
  • Tia R. Schultz
    • 6
  1. 1.Frank Porter Graham Child Development InstituteUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.University of Massachusetts at BostonBostonUSA
  3. 3.Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  4. 4.Michigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  5. 5.University of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  6. 6.University of Wisconsin at WhitewaterWhitewaterUSA

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