Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 45, Issue 6, pp 1766–1773

Changes in Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders in 2001–2011: Findings from the Stockholm Youth Cohort

  • Selma Idring
  • Michael Lundberg
  • Harald Sturm
  • Christina Dalman
  • Clara Gumpert
  • Dheeraj Rai
  • Brian K. Lee
  • Cecilia Magnusson
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-014-2336-y

Cite this article as:
Idring, S., Lundberg, M., Sturm, H. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2015) 45: 1766. doi:10.1007/s10803-014-2336-y

Abstract

In a record-linkage study in Stockholm, Sweden, the year 2011 prevalence of diagnosed autism spectrum disorders (ASD) was found to be 0.40, 1.74, 2.46, and 1.76 % among 0–5, 6–12, 13–17, and 18–27 year olds, respectively. The corresponding proportion of cases with a recorded diagnosis of intellectual disability was 17.4, 22.1, 26.1 and 29.4 %. Between 2001 and 2011, ASD prevalence increased almost 3.5 fold among children aged 2–17 years. The increase was mainly accounted for by an eightfold increase of ASD without intellectual disability (from 0.14 to 1.10 %), while the prevalence of ASD with intellectual disability increased only slightly (from 0.28 to 0.34 %). The increase in ASD prevalence is likely contributed to by extrinsic factors such as increased awareness and diagnostics.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorders Intellectual disability Prevalence Time trend Stockholm Sweden 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Selma Idring
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michael Lundberg
    • 1
  • Harald Sturm
    • 2
  • Christina Dalman
    • 1
    • 3
  • Clara Gumpert
    • 4
  • Dheeraj Rai
    • 1
    • 5
    • 6
  • Brian K. Lee
    • 7
  • Cecilia Magnusson
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Public Health SciencesKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Neurodevelopmental Psychiatry Unit Southeast, Child and Youth PsychiatryStockholm County CouncilStockholmSweden
  3. 3.Centre for Epidemiology and Community MedicineStockholm County CouncilStockholmSweden
  4. 4.Department of Clinical NeuroscienceKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  5. 5.Academic Unit of Psychiatry, School of Social and Community MedicineUniversity of BristolBristolUK
  6. 6.Avon and Wiltshire Partnership NHS Mental Health TrustBristolUK
  7. 7.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, A.J. Drexel Autism InstituteDrexel UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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