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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 45, Issue 12, pp 3792–3804 | Cite as

A Systematic Review of Tablet Computers and Portable Media Players as Speech Generating Devices for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Elizabeth R. Lorah
  • Ashley Parnell
  • Peggy Schaefer Whitby
  • Donald Hantula
Original Paper

Abstract

Powerful, portable, off-the-shelf handheld devices, such as tablet based computers (i.e., iPad®; Galaxy®) or portable multimedia players (i.e., iPod®), can be adapted to function as speech generating devices for individuals with autism spectrum disorders or related developmental disabilities. This paper reviews the research in this new and rapidly growing area and delineates an agenda for future investigations. In general, participants using these devices acquired verbal repertoires quickly. Studies comparing these devices to picture exchange or manual sign language found that acquisition was often quicker when using a tablet computer and that the vast majority of participants preferred using the device to picture exchange or manual sign language. Future research in interface design, user experience, and extended verbal repertoires is recommended.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Verbal behavior Speech generating device iPad iPod 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elizabeth R. Lorah
    • 1
  • Ashley Parnell
    • 1
  • Peggy Schaefer Whitby
    • 1
  • Donald Hantula
    • 2
  1. 1.University of ArkansasFayettevilleUSA
  2. 2.Temple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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