Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 45, Issue 5, pp 1428–1436 | Cite as

The Use of Grammatical Morphemes by Mandarin-Speaking Children with High Functioning Autism

  • Peng Zhou
  • Stephen Crain
  • Liqun Gao
  • Ye Tang
  • Meixiang Jia
Original Paper

Abstract

The present study investigated the production of grammatical morphemes by Mandarin-speaking children with high functioning autism. Previous research found that a subgroup of English-speaking children with autism exhibit deficits in the use of grammatical morphemes that mark tense. In order to see whether this impairment in grammatical morphology can be generalised to children with autism from other languages, the present study examined whether or not high-functioning Mandarin-speaking children with autism also exhibit deficits in using grammatical morphemes that mark aspect. The results show that Mandarin-speaking children with autism produced grammatical morphemes significantly less often than age-matched and IQ-matched TD peers as well as MLU-matched TD peers. The implications of these findings for understanding the grammatical abilities of children with autism were discussed.

Keywords

Autism Grammatical morphology Temporal processing Event structure Language development 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peng Zhou
    • 1
  • Stephen Crain
    • 1
  • Liqun Gao
    • 2
  • Ye Tang
    • 2
  • Meixiang Jia
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Cognitive Science, ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and Its DisordersMacquarie UniversitySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Beijing Language and Culture UniversityBeijingChina
  3. 3.Peking University Sixth HospitalBeijingChina

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