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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 44, Issue 5, pp 1128–1143 | Cite as

Measuring Anxiety as a Treatment Endpoint in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Luc Lecavalier
  • Jeffrey J. Wood
  • Alycia K. Halladay
  • Nancy E. Jones
  • Michael G. Aman
  • Edwin H. Cook
  • Benjamin L. Handen
  • Bryan H. King
  • Deborah A. Pearson
  • Victoria Hallett
  • Katherine Anne Sullivan
  • Sabrina Grondhuis
  • Somer L. Bishop
  • Joseph P. Horrigan
  • Geraldine Dawson
  • Lawrence ScahillEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Despite the high rate of anxiety in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), measuring anxiety in ASD is fraught with uncertainty. This is due, in part, to incomplete consensus on the manifestations of anxiety in this population. Autism Speaks assembled a panel of experts to conduct a systematic review of available measures for anxiety in youth with ASD. To complete the review, the panel held monthly conference calls and two face-to-face meetings over a fourteen-month period. Thirty eight published studies were reviewed and ten assessment measures were examined: four were deemed appropriate for use in clinical trials, although with conditions; three were judged to be potentially appropriate, while three were considered not useful for clinical trials assessing anxiety. Despite recent advances, additional relevant, reliable and valid outcome measures are needed to evaluate treatments for anxiety in ASD.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Anxiety Instrument Measure Assessment Treatment Intervention 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Autism Speaks provided resources for the collaborative activities of this workgroup.

Conflict of interest

Dr. Scahill: Roche, consultant; Pfizer, consultant; Bracket, consultant, BioMarin, consultant. Shire, research support; Roche, research support; Pfizer, research support. Dr. Aman: Roche, consultant; Bristol-Meyers Squibb, consultant, research grant; CogState Inc, Investigator training, Forest, consultant; Pfizer, consultant; Supernus, consultant; Johnson & Johnson, research grant. Dr. Handen has received research support from Eli Lilly, Curemark and Roche. Dr. King reports serving as a consultant to Biomarin and Neuropharm and as an unpaid consultant to Forest, Nastech, and Seaside Therapeutics. He has received or has pending research grant support from Neuropharm and Seaside Therapeutics. Dr. Pearson has received research support from Curemark LLC and Forest, has pending support from BioMarin and Novartis, and has served as a consultant to Curemark LLC and Bracket. Drs. Horrigan and Jones are currently employed at Neuren Pharmaceuticals. Dr. Cook has served as a consultant and has received research grant support from Seaside Therapeutics. Dr. Dawson is on the Professional Advisory Board for Integragen, Inc.; Consultant, Nastech, Inc., Seaside Therapeutics, Inc. Drs. Lecavalier, Wood, Hallett, Sullivan, and Ms. Grondhuis report no financial relationships with commercial interests.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luc Lecavalier
    • 1
  • Jeffrey J. Wood
    • 2
  • Alycia K. Halladay
    • 3
  • Nancy E. Jones
    • 3
    • 11
  • Michael G. Aman
    • 1
  • Edwin H. Cook
    • 4
  • Benjamin L. Handen
    • 5
  • Bryan H. King
    • 6
  • Deborah A. Pearson
    • 7
  • Victoria Hallett
    • 8
  • Katherine Anne Sullivan
    • 9
  • Sabrina Grondhuis
    • 1
  • Somer L. Bishop
    • 10
  • Joseph P. Horrigan
    • 3
    • 11
  • Geraldine Dawson
    • 3
    • 12
  • Lawrence Scahill
    • 13
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Psychology and Nisonger CenterOhio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Education and Psychiatry and Biobehavioral SciencesUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Autism SpeaksNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Institute for Juvenile Research, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA
  5. 5.University of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA
  6. 6.Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of Washington and Seattle Children’s HospitalSeattleUSA
  7. 7.Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of Texas Medical SchoolHoustonUSA
  8. 8.Kings College LondonLondonUK
  9. 9.Department of PsychologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  10. 10.Department of Psychology and PsychiatryWeill Cornell Medical CollegeNew YorkUSA
  11. 11.Neuren Pharmaceuticals LimitedDurhamUSA
  12. 12.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  13. 13.Department of Pediatrics, Marcus CenterEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA

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